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Canadian wondering about applying to School in US for Engineering

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  • Thread starter Millacol88
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Main Question or Discussion Point

Well, I'm in grade 11, I think the major for me is Aerospace engineering. Unfortunately, there are only two schools in Canada that offer a dedicated aerospace engineering program, and neither of them are extremely well-regarded in terms of academics (as I understand).

Which leads me to my question: How big of a hassle would it be to do my undergrad in the US? I mean in terms of admissions, cost, residence, etc. Would I have to take the SATs as well? We haven't got them here. Any help is greatly appreciated.
 

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I know of one, University of Toronto Eng Sci Aerospace Engineering which is well-regarded nationally and internationally.
 
  • #3
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I know of one, University of Toronto Eng Sci Aerospace Engineering which is well-regarded nationally and internationally.
Sorry, I forgot to mention in my OP that I have considered that option, but I'm not sure I will have the grades to get in, and if I did whether I could manage to stay in it.
 
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As Kevin said, U of T has an Aero program within EngSci, which you can tell from the name is probably less applied than other Aero programs. U of T is one of the best schools in Canada and if you can get through it, you'll be able to go to the states for graduate school (if you want). Otherwise, Carleton University offers an Aerospace engineering program (I believe the 1st in Canada) with 4 branches (Aerodynamics/propulsion, structures/systems/vehicle design, space system design and electronics and systems). Pretty much all undergraduate programs teach the same thing as long as they are accredited, which Carleton is. I think Ryerson has one also...
 
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Would you say there's a difference in regards to the sorts of jobs available between Carleton and UofT? I am much closer to Carleton, and along with the easier courseload I think I would prefer it. But if there is a huge difference in the programs I may reconsider. I figured if I couldn't decide on either of them going to the States would be best, but upon researching it a bit after I made this thread I found that tuition, residence, and expenses were nearly 50k/year (that was for a high-ranking state school).
 
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  • #7
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Would you say there's a difference in regards to the sorts of jobs available between Carleton and UofT? I am much closer to Carleton, and along with the easier courseload I think I would prefer it. But if there is a huge difference in the programs I may reconsider. I figured if I couldn't decide on either of them going to the States would be best, but upon researching it a bit after I made this thread I found that tuition, residence, and expenses were nearly 50k/year (that was for a high-ranking state school).
I don't know a whole lot about the EngSci (Aerospace) at U of T but I'd suspect U of T would prepare one better for an MSc (even though Carleton Aero would still definately prepare you). U of T would have a "better" reputation among grad schools in the states. I can't find the required courses for U of T EngSci, but here are the ones for http://www2.carleton.ca/engineering-design/current-students/undergrad-academic-support/prerequisite-trees/prerequisite-trees-as-of-fall-2010/" [Broken]. You can PM me if you have any specific questions about Carleton.
 
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Honestly, UofT better preparing me for grad studies in the US wouldn't really be beneficial as I would probably pick UofT for a grad school whether I went to Carleton or UofT for undergrad.
 
  • #9
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I'm not sure I will have the grades to get in, and if I did whether I could manage to stay in it.
along with the easier courseload I think I would prefer it.
I would probably pick UofT for a grad school whether I went to Carleton or UofT for undergrad.
Honestly, these statements really contradict each other. You can't say a university is too tough for undergraduate studies, but count on going there for grad school. By that I'm not saying it is too tough for you, but just that the logic of your thinking is somewhat convoluted.
 
  • #10
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Honestly, these statements really contradict each other. You can't say a university is too tough for undergraduate studies, but count on going there for grad school. By that I'm not saying it is too tough for you, but just that the logic of your thinking is somewhat convoluted.
I am more intimidated by the rigor of the specific program I mentioned, not the University itself. the dropout/transfer rate from engsci makes me nervous, as well as being so far from home my first time living alone. Hope that clarifies things.
 
  • #11
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I am more intimidated by the rigor of the specific program I mentioned, not the University itself. the dropout/transfer rate from engsci makes me nervous,
As far as this is concerned, my point still stands. Grad school isn't easier or less selective than undergrad (note: I do not have personal experience with grad school yet, but I think this is the general consensus).
as well as being so far from home my first time living alone.
And as for this, don't worry, I know it's scary moving away from the comfort and security of your own home, but it is a step you'll need (want) to take someday. So don't let those scary thoughts influence your decision on what university to attend, because once you've settled in, you'll see those fears were hollow on the inside.
 
  • #12
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I am more intimidated by the rigor of the specific program I mentioned, not the University itself. the dropout/transfer rate from engsci makes me nervous, as well as being so far from home my first time living alone. Hope that clarifies things.
Dropouts from engineering school are high in general... The workload just isn't even comparable to that of high school. It's the workload that kills people, not generally the specific material. If you're at least decent at math/science and you're willing to put in a ton of work, then the only reason you'll drop out is from lack of interest in the program. You're actually probably better off if you go into it a little intimidated. A huge portion of the people who I've seen drop out of my eng program dropped out because of cockiness: they saw themselves as 'gods of science' and bragged about how well they did in high school with no effort. They thought they could coast through a uni program in a similar fashion and were shocked to find that they actually had to study HARD in order to do moderately well. Those who came in with an "I need to study or I'm going to fail" attitude did a lot better.

It doesn't really matter which university you go to. Expect that you're going to have to work a lot harder than you've ever worked before. But at least understand that most people drop out from poor work ethic or because they realize they aren't interested in engineering, and not because they aren't smart enough.
 
  • #13
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Dropouts from engineering school are high in general... The workload just isn't even comparable to that of high school. It's the workload that kills people, not generally the specific material. If you're at least decent at math/science and you're willing to put in a ton of work, then the only reason you'll drop out is from lack of interest in the program. You're actually probably better off if you go into it a little intimidated. A huge portion of the people who I've seen drop out of my eng program dropped out because of cockiness: they saw themselves as 'gods of science' and bragged about how well they did in high school with no effort. They thought they could coast through a uni program in a similar fashion and were shocked to find that they actually had to study HARD in order to do moderately well. Those who came in with an "I need to study or I'm going to fail" attitude did a lot better.

It doesn't really matter which university you go to. Expect that you're going to have to work a lot harder than you've ever worked before. But at least understand that most people drop out from poor work ethic or because they realize they aren't interested in engineering, and not because they aren't smart enough.
You are right but someone who is familiar with the Eng Sci program will know that it is a lot more difficult. It's necessary to take courses in quantum mechanics and I believe they take seven courses per semester.
 
  • #14
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You are right but someone who is familiar with the Eng Sci program will know that it is a lot more difficult. It's necessary to take courses in quantum mechanics and I believe they take seven courses per semester.
Yup, and if they know they will most likely switch over to a 'regular' engineering discipline their will be no advantage of them being at the school over say Queens/Carleton/McMaster/Waterloo, etc...
 

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