Changing my life from Engineering to Theoretical Physics

In summary, a long time has been that I've decided changing my job from engineering to theoretical physics. Because I don't want to learn the rules that have been discovered by any scientists and make a situation about getting it real. I want to learn how the rules of nature is being discovered and what the experiments have been made to discover them? Namely this is a big deal and a long way because physics takes your life and years. If you want to success, you need to devote your life for this. I've started from Calculus I & University Physics - I (Classical Mechanics and Electromagnetism). So this is the list of lessons I've researched from web and take some advices from my friends that I
  • #1
w4y021
3
2
Long times have been that I've decided changing my job from engineering to theoretical physics. Because I don't want to learn the rules that have been discovered by any scientists and make a situation about getting it real :]. I want to learn how the rules of nature is being discovered and what the experiments have been made to discover them? Namely this is a big deal and a long way because physics takes your life and years. If you want to success, you need to devote your life for this. I've started from Calculus I & University Physics - I (Classical Mechanics and Electromagnetism). So this is the list of lessons I've researched from web and take some advices from my friends that I need to learn and jump to Quantum Mechanics, Statistical Mechanics, Electromagnetic Field Theory etc. when they finished.

Calculus - I - II (Single & Multivariable Calculus)
University Physics - I - II (Classical Mechanics & Electromagnetism) ==> Book: University Physics (Young and Freedman)

Optics & Waves ==> Book: (Can you offer one?)
Differential Equations ==> Book: Elementary Differential Equations (Meade-DiPrima-Boyce)
Linear Algebra ==> Book: Introduction to Linear Algebra (Gilbert Strang)
Probability and Statistics ==> Book: Introduction to Probability (Bertsekas & Tsitsiklis)

So for the other lectures I'm waiting your advices of books like quantum physics, statistical mechanics...

Or any other advices howto study physics and maths. Take care:]
 
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  • #2
I trust you are aware of MIT open courseware... For instance Prof Strang's lectures are there for Linear Algebra. And Prof. Lewin's physics lectures can still be viewed variously from other sources (a sad interlude).
 
  • #3
There is an oversupply of talented graduates in theoretical physics relative to the number of full time long term jobs for them. Many end up working in industry doing other things or in education doing more teaching than theoretical physics.

The supply of graduates in engineering is well matched or a bit less than the demand for them in full time long term jobs, depending on the field of engineering and geography.

Depending on your station in life and resources, it may not be worth the time and effort to acquire training in theoretical physics if finding a job in the field is unlikely.
 
  • #4
I am completely confused by your history and your plan. What is it you are trying to do? Seld-study and then take a job as a theoretical physicist? And how did you get to be a civil engineer without taking elementary physics?
 

1. What inspired you to make the switch from engineering to theoretical physics?

I have always been fascinated by the mysteries of the universe and how it operates. As an engineer, I found myself constantly drawn to the theoretical concepts behind the technology I was working on. This curiosity led me to pursue a deeper understanding of physics and ultimately make the switch to theoretical physics.

2. What are the main differences between engineering and theoretical physics?

Engineering is focused on applying scientific principles to design and create practical solutions to real-world problems. Theoretical physics, on the other hand, is more concerned with developing and testing theories that explain the fundamental laws of nature. While both fields involve a strong foundation in math and science, they have distinct approaches and goals.

3. Will my engineering background be helpful in studying theoretical physics?

Absolutely! While the subjects may seem different, engineering and theoretical physics both require a strong understanding of math, problem-solving skills, and the ability to think critically. Your engineering background will provide a solid foundation for studying theoretical physics and may even give you a unique perspective on certain concepts.

4. How can I prepare for a career in theoretical physics after studying engineering?

There are a few ways you can prepare for a career in theoretical physics after studying engineering. First, you can take additional courses in math and physics to strengthen your knowledge in these areas. You can also participate in research projects or internships related to theoretical physics to gain practical experience. Additionally, networking with professionals in the field and attending conferences can help you make connections and learn more about potential career paths.

5. What career opportunities are available for someone with a background in engineering and theoretical physics?

With a background in engineering and theoretical physics, you may have a variety of career opportunities available to you. Some options include working in research and development, academia, or in a technical role for a company. You may also have the opportunity to work on groundbreaking projects and contribute to our understanding of the universe. Additionally, your skills and knowledge may be valuable in other fields such as finance, data science, or technology.

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