Common name translation and transcription molecules?

In summary, while the molecules involved in DNA replication are collectively referred to as the replisome, there is no specific term for all the molecules involved in protein synthesis. However, "protein synthetic machinery" may be a suitable term for searching. In eukaryotic cells, protein synthesis is carried out by distinct complexes, with transcription occurring in the nucleus and translation occurring in the cytoplasm. The main protein complex involved in transcription is RNA polymerase II, which recruits other complexes for RNA processing. Translation is carried out by the ribosome.
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icakeov
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The molecules that replicate DNA are collectively called "replisome".

Is there a similar term for all the molecules that synthesize proteins (both through translation and transcription)? Short of, of course, "protein synthesizers".

I can't seem to find the term, any feedback appreciated!
 
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  • #2
"Protein synthetic machinery" seems to work for searching.
 
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Great, thanks BillTre!
 
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The replisome is termed such because many of the components involved in DNA replication come together in time and space to form a complex of different proteins to carry out DNA replication. In contrast, the two steps of protein synthesis, transcription and translation, are carried out by distinct complexes (in fact, in eukaryotic cells, these two processes are carried out in completely separate compartments of the cell, with transcription occurring in the nucleus and translation occurring in the cytoplasm).

In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase II (itself a multiprotein complex) carries out transcription to produce mRNAs. During transcription, pol II (mainly thorugh its C-terminal domain) will recruit various other complexes (e.g. the spliceosome) to carry out the various RNA processing steps required for a pre-mRNA to be converted to a mature mRNA. Translation is carried out by the large protein-RNA complex called the ribosome.
 
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Related to Common name translation and transcription molecules?

1. What is the difference between translation and transcription?

Translation is the process by which the genetic information stored in DNA is used to create proteins, while transcription is the process of transcribing DNA into RNA.

2. How are common names assigned to molecules?

Common names for molecules are usually given based on their chemical structure or function. These names are often descriptive and easy to remember, but they may vary depending on the language and region.

3. Can common names for molecules differ between languages?

Yes, common names for molecules can differ between languages. For example, the molecule commonly known as water in English is called "agua" in Spanish and "eau" in French.

4. Are there any limitations to using common names for molecules?

While common names for molecules can be helpful, they are not always specific or accurate. This can lead to confusion and difficulty in communication, especially among scientists from different backgrounds. Therefore, it is important to use the scientific names or chemical formulas to ensure clarity and precision.

5. How do scientists ensure consistency in the use of common names for molecules?

To ensure consistency, scientists often use standardized naming systems such as the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) naming system. This system provides a systematic way to name molecules based on their chemical structure and functional groups.

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