1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Compton effect and visible light

  1. Feb 7, 2006 #1
    why is it extremely dificult to observe the compton effect using visible light?

    is it because visible light does not have a short enough wavelenght to excite the electrons?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 7, 2006 #2

    SpaceTiger

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Compton scattering becomes noticable when the energy of the light is comparable to the rest energy of the electron (~511 keV, hard X-rays). Visible light is much less energetic than this (~few eV), so the scattering process can conserve energy and momentum without a significant change in the wavelength of the photon.
     
  4. Feb 7, 2006 #3
    does wavelength tell you the energy?
     
  5. Feb 7, 2006 #4

    SpaceTiger

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Yes. For a photon,

    [tex]E=h\nu=\frac{hc}{\lambda}[/tex]
     
  6. Feb 7, 2006 #5
    so my assumption that visible light does not have a short enough wavelenght to excite the electrons is correct? since thei wavelenght is long, making energy low, hence, not enough eV to excite the electron?
     
  7. Feb 7, 2006 #6

    SpaceTiger

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    The electron can receive both energy and momentum from a visible photon, but both would be just a tiny fraction of its rest energy. But yes, that's basically right.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Compton effect and visible light
  1. Compton Effect (Replies: 1)

  2. Compton effect (Replies: 7)

  3. Compton Effect (Replies: 3)

  4. Compton Effect (Replies: 3)

Loading...