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Concept and subject of latex and its usage and related questions on latex

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  1. Sep 25, 2014 #1
    latex.png Hi, I have newly encountered with a subject called LaTeX. I try to learn it. I know it is a document preparation program. Can I install on my PC and start to use it like Matlab? For example where can I use this code?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMS-LaTeX

    Thank you.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 26, 2014 #2
    There is a pinned thread right at the top...have you read that one?
     
  4. Sep 26, 2014 #3
    I am examining that topic now. this concept is so unfamiliar to me and even students around me haven't heard name of it.

    Thank you.
     
  5. Sep 26, 2014 #4

    FactChecker

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    Whereas LaTeX is a documentation tool, MATLAB is a very powerful calculation tool.
    There are free downloads available. There are also web sites that you can reference in an HTML file that will process LaTex code that you put into that html file. I forget how that is done, but if you look at the source of a simple HTML file displaying LaTex, you will see it.
     
  6. Sep 29, 2014 #5
    I am not a very good computer user. Up until now I have never dealt with HTML files, just saved them on my PC. How can I look at a source of a simple HTML file, If it is only for Website design, should I follow a source for HTML? It seems that I need more guidance on Latex and maybe HTML.

    Thank you.
     
  7. Sep 29, 2014 #6

    Borek

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    If you have a HTML file saved on your disk and you open it with the Windows notepad, you will see it as the source, not as a rendered page.
     
  8. Sep 29, 2014 #7
    Are HTML files(or what are their general names, because there are MHTML files) dropped into two categories and rendered file is that which we see in web browser such as internet explorer and source file is that which we open in a writing editör such as notepad, ms Word?

    Thank you
     
  9. Sep 29, 2014 #8

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    What you see in the web browser is the image rendered interpreting the source file. I am not aware of other formats (that is, when you save a page from the browser it can do some tricks and save in its own format, but these are not exactly standardized).
     
  10. Sep 29, 2014 #9

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    Microsoft Word can save files in a number of formats, including
    • Single file Web page (*.mht or *mhtml)
    • Web page (*.htm or *.html)
    • Word XML (*.xml)
    • PDF (*.pdf)
    and several others.
    Many of these formats, such as the HTML and XML formats, are text that can be viewed in Notepad (as Borek suggested) or other text editors.
     
  11. Sep 29, 2014 #10

    FactChecker

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    This is example LaTeX code in an HTML file. Remove the begin and end verbatim lines. Put this into a file with extension .htm and double click it. Your web browser will read it and sent the LaTex to the link shown for interpretation. Sometimes there is a delay while the web site interpretes the LaTeX. That is why you often see the raw LaTeX for a while before it is turned into math equations.

    \begin{verbatim}
    <html>
    <body>

    [tex]\Delta \theta = \omega_0 t + \frac{1}{2} \alpha t^2.[/tex]
    [itex]y = a x^2 + bx + c[/itex]

    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://cdn.mathjax.org/mathjax/2.2-...//www.physicsforums.com/mathjax/mjsettings.js"></script>

    </body>
    </html>
    \end{verbatim}

    Here is what it should look like.
    [tex]\Delta \theta = \omega_0 t + \frac{1}{2} \alpha t^2.[/tex]
    [itex]y = a x^2 + bx + c[/itex]
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2014
  12. Sep 30, 2014 #11

    jtbell

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    As others have noted, if you save a web page from your browser as a .html file, you should be able to open it in a text editor like Notepad (Windows) or TextEdit (Mac OS).

    Also, I think most or all web browsers have an option to view the source code of the current page. In Firefox (Mac OS), from the menu bar: Tools --> Web Developer --> Page Source.
     
  13. Sep 30, 2014 #12

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    Often just Ctrl-U.
     
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