Condition for circular-wire polarizer to transmit no light

In summary: Unfortunately, he makes no reference to the gaps between the wires, rather only the dimensions of the wires themselvesAndy,I don't think the OP has grasped the way a polariser would work and he's just flying a kite. He could look at this link for an idea about a real wire polariser. Unfortunately, he makes no reference to the gaps between the wires, rather only the dimensions of the wires themselves.ZapperZ,I don't think the OP has grasped the way a polariser would work and he's just flying a kite. He could look at this link for an idea about a real wire polariser. Unfortunately, he makes no reference to the gaps between the wires,
  • #1
Christofer Br
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I want to make a wire grid surface that transmits no light. For that I wanted to use quarter-circular arc wires. My question is what dimensions would I need to apply to the wires, would an arc with radius = wavelength of incident light be sufficient (since then it is the size of a wavelength in both dimensions) , or do i need a more complicated geometry?
 
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  • #2
Christofer Br said:
I want to make a wire grid surface that transmits no light.

wire won't transmit light unless it is directly heated or high current through it, till it glows

you then go on to talk about incident light ... did you really mean reflect light ?

your post is a little confusing, would you like to clarify what it is you are really referring to and give some background to what you are trying to achieve

Dave
 
  • #3
davenn said:
wire won't transmit light unless it is directly heated or high current through it, till it glows

you then go on to talk about incident light ... did you really mean reflect light ?

your post is a little confusing, would you like to clarify what it is you are really referring to and give some background to what you are trying to achieve

Dave
You have mistaken emission with transmission. The wire will reflect incident light, while absorbing a small fraction of it's energy, therefore transmitting none.
 
  • #4
Christofer Br said:
You have mistaken emission with transmission.

no I haven't

you have mistaken emission for reflection :wink:

emission comes from within, reflection comes from incident EM ( light etc) reflection from surface

Christofer Br said:
The wire will reflect incident light, while absorbing a small fraction of it's energy, therefore transmitting none.

and I seriously doubt the validity of that comment
 
  • #5
Christofer Br said:
The wire will reflect incident light, while absorbing a small fraction of it's energy, therefore transmitting none.
Have you actually done any calculations about the required thickness of a "wire" that would behave as you claim? Wire polarisers work fine with microwaves.
This thread reads like a re-run of one that ran only a day or two ago. Double posting is not appreciated on PF.
 
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  • #6
sophiecentaur said:
Have you actually done any calculations about the required thickness of a "wire" that would behave as you claim? Wire polarisers work fine with microwaves.

uh huh and opaque to light
 
  • #7
davenn said:
uh huh and opaque to light
What about the gaps in between the wires? A wire polarizer for microwaves is more gap than metal.
davenn said:
uh huh and opaque to light
But the gaps in between the grid?
 
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  • #8
sophiecentaur said:
What about the gaps in between the wires? A wire polarizer for microwaves is more gap than metal.

yeah true , but he's talking about light, not RF ( microwaves) :wink:

sophiecentaur said:
But the gaps in between the grid?

I was referring to the wires being opaque
Christofer Br said:
I want to make a wire grid surface that transmits no light. For that I wanted to use quarter-circular arc wires. My question is what dimensions would I need to apply to the wires, would an arc with radius = wavelength of incident light be sufficient (since then it is the size of a wavelength in both dimensions) , or do i need a more complicated geometry?
unfortunately, he makes no reference to the gaps between the wires, rather only the dimensions of the wires themselves
I, like you, would have thought that it was the size of the gaps relative to the wavelength of the light, that were more important as to if the light would pass through or not

@Andy Resnick , @ZapperZ
or someone else more knowledgeable in optics can help out please ??
Dave
 
  • #9
davenn said:
I was referring to the wires being opaque
This is turning a bit comedic. A wire on its own doesn't constitute a Polariser. It would just be a scatterer and the scattered EM would have a small polarised component. Is there any reference to this form of polariser that could work at optical wavelengths? I have comment already on the fact that it is essentially a microwave component and there are a lot of octaves needed to get from mm+ wavelengths to hundreds of nanometers.
I don't think the OP has grasped the way a polariser would work and he's just flying a kite. He could look at this link for an idea about a real wire polariser.
 
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Related to Condition for circular-wire polarizer to transmit no light

1. What is a circular-wire polarizer?

A circular-wire polarizer is a type of optical filter that is used to selectively transmit light of a specific polarization. It consists of a series of parallel wires arranged in a circular pattern, with a spacing that is smaller than the wavelength of the incident light.

2. How does a circular-wire polarizer work?

A circular-wire polarizer works by selectively absorbing light that is polarized in a specific direction. When unpolarized light passes through the polarizer, the waves that are polarized in the same direction as the wires are absorbed, while the waves that are polarized perpendicular to the wires are transmitted.

3. What is the condition for a circular-wire polarizer to transmit no light?

The condition for a circular-wire polarizer to transmit no light is when the incident light is polarized in the same direction as the wires. In this case, all of the light waves will be absorbed, resulting in no transmitted light.

4. What factors can affect the condition for a circular-wire polarizer to transmit no light?

The condition for a circular-wire polarizer to transmit no light can be affected by the spacing between the wires, the diameter of the wires, and the wavelength of the incident light. Changes in these parameters can alter the polarization of the transmitted light and affect the condition for no transmission.

5. What are some practical applications of circular-wire polarizers?

Circular-wire polarizers have a variety of practical applications, including in optical instruments such as cameras and microscopes, in LCD displays to control the polarization of light, and in polarized sunglasses to reduce glare. They are also used in scientific research to study the polarization of light in various experiments.

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