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Confusion with using which linux distributions

  1. Oct 6, 2015 #1
    I looked in forum and i couldnt find a useful thread (useful for me).
    I am currently using C# and PHP and im going to learn C and java for university soon
    For general uses i mostly use windows (Photoshop , ...) . I currently have ubuntu on my laptop (wanted to install kali too). I want to use it mainly for programming and security penetration (which kali can cover)
    What other options do i have ?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 6, 2015 #2
  4. Jun 18, 2016 #3
    You can install any virtual machine solutions you like: VirtualBox or VMWare Player on your Windows PC and install Kali Linux in the virtual machine.
    I think that will be the best solution for you at this moment.

    You also can install a Kali on your laptop, of course, using dual-boot and boot on it after Ubuntu when you need it.
    The choice is up to you.
     
  5. Jun 18, 2016 #4

    QuantumQuest

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    This is not a Linux distro forum, but I cannot see your point in this. If you have a question like this, there are many CS people here to help.

    Your options are really many, depending on what exactly you want to do. As imort point out, your best bet is to install a virtual machine on your Windows machine - I personally prefer VirtualBox but there are other free and good solutions too, and experiment with various Linux distros. It is best to avoid multi - boot configurations on Windows, as this can render your Windows inoperable, if you don't know how to do it. Virtual machine is a more safe way to go, regarding your machine itself that will become a host in this way and various security issues.

    As for the choice of a Linux distribution, there is a whole multitude of choices, but keep in mind that they are more or less the same at their "heart", for all practical purposes. They have different packages for installing/upgrading various utilities and applications and different bells and whistles regarding their UIs but this has to do mostly with the average user and does not pose any problem for a programmer whatsoever. Ubuntu is a decent distribution and you can work on it. As a rule of thumb, choose what you find more convenient to work on.
     
  6. Jun 18, 2016 #5
    I'm not sure a Virtual Machine is always the best choice. If one's computer has few GBs of RAM it could be an issue, as I have already gone throught. Everything starts to freeze, especially when dealing with heavy computation and programs inside de VM. It was a really frustrating experience.

    If your PC is kind of old, or not that good at least, it is probably better to have a dual-boot. On the other hand, if your computer can handle, having a VM is easier, as you don't have all the stress to make partitions, backups, etc.

    For the distribution, as already pointed out, there are a LOT of options, but the core is the same. It depends on your taste as well as your knowledge. Ubuntu is the easiest to use when coming from Windows, as the user interface is similar and if you don't want to write command lines, you can. The Mint is another one with a good interface and easy to use. Some others, like ArchLinux can be a nightmare for those Who don't know a lot about Linux, computers and command lines.

    I usually suggest Ubuntu or Mint. I myself use Ubuntu, because when I'm tired of typing command lines I can just use the interface with no loss of usability. I have to say, though, that this interface is becoming very computational costy in the latest versions.
     
  7. Jun 18, 2016 #6
    Well, I'll try to give some contribution. A lot of people already suggested distributions. I'm more of a RPM guy, so my suggestions would be openSUSE and Fedora.

    The truth is: you can install development tools on any distribution. And you can install penetration testing tools in any distribution. I suggest you install on your computer or VM any of the distros you want to use. Test it. See what you like or dislike. Use for 1 or 2 weeks, then test another distribution. I'll find out soon which is better to you.

    Linux distributions are like ice cream flavors, you have to taste it and see what you like.

    I hope this helps.
     
  8. Jun 18, 2016 #7

    QuantumQuest

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    Yes, I have pointed this out also in other posts but given the sufficiently enough resources a modern computer has and it's low price, VM resource consumption is no more an issue.

    On the other hand, because I have been dealing extensively with multi boot configurations in the past - back in 2002 I had a PC with a 2.53 GHz processor and 1 GB RAM (500 MB initial + 500 MB added) with 2 hard disks and 6 different OSs, having GRUB to corrupt Windows boot sector is the easiest thing to happen. So, given today's machines power, virtual machines is by far the best and safest solution.
     
  9. Jun 24, 2016 #8
    You will not be familiar with 90% of the tools that come with Kali. There is no reason for a hobbyist to install Kali along with another linux distro. Pen testing programs can be installed as needed.

    If you want a project try installing Arch Linux. You get to practice things like manually partitioning, and installing your GUI.
    Personally I think Ubuntu is too amateurish. A good step above would be Fedora.
    You need to do the research yourself. There is no right answer, and it is evident from your OP that you have not researched the question you are asking.

    Lastly I'd like to point out to you that you should not get carried away. Focus on your current classes. If you're already excelling and have tons of free time look up the first year syllabus for the university you plan to attend.
     
  10. Jun 25, 2016 #9

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

    Note that AliGh posted his original question more than eight months ago. I hope he has made some progress by now! :olduhh:
     
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