Consider z=f(x,y) where x = r*cos(theta) and y = r*sin(theta)

  • Thread starter QuantumPixel
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In summary, the use of polar coordinates in a function allows for a more intuitive representation of complex geometric shapes. To convert a function from Cartesian coordinates to polar coordinates, we use equations to represent distance and angle. A function in polar coordinates can also be converted back to Cartesian coordinates. The advantages of using polar coordinates in mathematical calculations include simplifying complex functions and aiding in visualization. Polar coordinates have many real-world applications, particularly in fields such as physics, engineering, and astronomy. They are useful in analyzing circular and rotational motion and problems involving symmetry.
  • #1
Use the chain rule to show that

dz/dx = (cos(theta) * dz/dr) - (1/r * sin(theta) dz/dtheta) and

dz/dy = (sin(theta) dz/dr) + 1/r * cos(theta) dz/dtheta)

where dz/dx, dz/dr, dz/dtheta, and dz/dy and first partial derivatives.

Saw this a textbook the other day and I did not understand it.
 
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  • #2
The question starts with "Use the chain rule to show that dz/dx = ..."
What does the chain rule tell you about dz/dx?
 

1. What is the purpose of using polar coordinates in the function z=f(x,y)?

The use of polar coordinates in the function z=f(x,y) allows for a more intuitive representation of complex geometric shapes. By converting the rectangular coordinates (x,y) into polar coordinates (r,θ), the function can be visualized as a surface with a radial distance and angle, making it easier to interpret and analyze.

2. How do we convert a function from Cartesian coordinates to polar coordinates?

To convert a function from Cartesian coordinates (x,y) to polar coordinates (r,θ), we use the following equations: r = √(x² + y²) and θ = tan⁻¹(y/x). These equations represent the distance from the origin and the angle with the positive x-axis, respectively.

3. Can a function in polar coordinates be converted back to Cartesian coordinates?

Yes, a function in polar coordinates can be converted back to Cartesian coordinates using the following equations: x = r*cos(θ) and y = r*sin(θ). These equations represent the x and y coordinates in terms of the radial distance and angle, respectively.

4. What are the advantages of using polar coordinates in mathematical calculations?

Polar coordinates offer several advantages in mathematical calculations. They can simplify the representation of complex functions, particularly those with circular or rotational symmetry. They also make it easier to visualize and analyze functions in a geometric sense.

5. Are polar coordinates used in real-world applications?

Yes, polar coordinates have numerous applications in fields such as physics, engineering, and astronomy. They are particularly useful in representing circular and rotational motion, as well as in solving problems involving symmetry. Examples include analyzing planetary orbits, designing antennas, and determining the direction of sound waves.

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