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Considering doing physics as 2nd major

  1. Sep 30, 2007 #1
    I am currently a computer science major, I am taking 300 level courses in that so I am fairly far along in it. I have recently come to believe I may need a second major in physics to do anything of interest with it (not just working on a business software application that keeps track of a bunch of meaningless numbers). With a degree in physics and in computer science I figured I should be able to do just about anything that might interest me related to engineering or computers.

    I am at the point where I need to commit one way or the other because I am currently finishing up the last course in the "general physics" series of courses which touch on lots of issues without going into lots of detail (course 1 was mostly newtonian physics, 2 was mostly classical EM, 3 so far has been mostly been propagation of light).

    I read several posts on this board in which people were saying theoretical physics is often very difficult to apply, and I draw from that maybe a degree in physics would not be as good of complement to a computer science degree as I thought it might be.

    Can anyone say if this would be a very useful combination or not? At this point it would take me 2 or 3 extra semesters + summer semesters with a significantly increased work load during each semester. I wonder if it would be worth it.
     
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  3. Sep 30, 2007 #2

    G01

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    Do you enjoy what you are doing in physics? If you find it interesting, and worth the extra semester with lot's of work, then I'd say go for it. If you love physics, it'll definitely pay off in the end.
     
  4. Sep 30, 2007 #3
    Computer Science is a fairly common second major for Physics majors, so...also software-related jobs are common for physics graduates. If that's the direction you want to take your career, and it's stuff you're interested in learning anyway, it sounds like a good move.

    There may be other programs worth considering like applied mathematics. My uni has an "applied computing and mathematics" program with many options like scientific computing and so forth. What's most appropriate depends on what you want to learn.
     
  5. Sep 30, 2007 #4
    That seems like a common combination. Computer science and physics. I was at the computer science career fair a couple of months ago, and found they were looking for a lot of physics people as well in addition to their computer science degree. I'd say, go for it.

    Frankly, I think it might even be a better combination that Computer Science and Math. The one I plan on going into.
     
  6. Sep 30, 2007 #5

    G01

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    Also, you may want to look into computational physics as a possible career path.
     
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