Creating turbulence in a small tube

In summary, a flush mount exit is more likely to promote flow in the direction of the low pressure point at the mouth of the outlet tube.
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TL;DR Summary
My question is will this cause turbulence in the larger chamber so that the air from the Yellow Question mark area is being pulled and mixed with the air from the intake area? Is there an equation I can use to know the best depth range to test the set the smaller chamber at? See picture
Dull_tool.jpg

I have an odd question or a project I have been bouncing around in my head and I want to make sure that I am understanding the science of it all correctly. My question is will this cause turbulence in the larger chamber so that the air from the Yellow Question mark area is being pulled and mixed with the air from the intake area? Is there an equation I can use to know the best depth range to test the set of the smaller chamber at? I understand I am going to have to build protypes and get my Dr. Tyson on. I just like to set parameters so I do not have to build more units than necessary. Arrows are air flow. So air is drawn in the over lay, up the heat sink, in the heat sink, into the chamber, then out the exit tube.

I mainly want to know if this will help cool the heated area faster by drawing more heat from causing turbulence in the chamber, as apposed to the exit tube being flush with the end of the chamber.

Thank you all I hope I made it clear what I'm asking.
 
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  • #2
I read your question as should the dashed portion of the exit tube should be inserted into the chamber as-drawn if the goal is to promote turbulent flow within the chamber.

My intuition says this will be more likely (relative to the likeliehood of creating turbulence) to create a high pressure stagnation zone behind the inserted portion of the tube and tend to decrease the overall heat-transfer along the walls of the chamber. I intuit that you are better off with a flush mount exit, for what that opinion is worth. As drawn, I don't see anything that will promote flow to the right of the low pressure point at the mouth of the outlet tube.
 
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  • #3
Grinkle said:
I read your question as should the dashed portion of the exit tube should be inserted into the chamber as-drawn if the goal is to promote turbulent flow within the chamber.

My intuition says this will be more likely (relative to the likeliehood of creating turbulence) to create a high pressure stagnation zone behind the inserted portion of the tube and tend to decrease the overall heat-transfer along the walls of the chamber. I intuit that you are better off with a flush mount exit, for what that opinion is worth. As drawn, I don't see anything that will promote flow to the right of the low pressure point at the mouth of the outlet tube.
Ty I can’t remember what it’s called but I was trying to do the old put the fan a few feet from the window trick to improve the air movement in the chamber…. I’m sorry I just had an epiphany I got to go jot this down before my sleep demanding brain forgets. Thank you you helped more than you know.
 
  • #4
Go to 14:30 in this video to see how this guy made his intakes, they seemed to do what he wanted.

Mikek
 
  • #5
Dull Tool said:
TL;DR Summary: My question is will this cause turbulence in the larger chamber so that the air from the Yellow Question mark area is being pulled and mixed with the air from the intake area? Is there an equation I can use to know the best depth range to test the set the smaller chamber at? See picture

View attachment 321957
I have an odd question or a project I have been bouncing around in my head and I want to make sure that I am understanding the science of it all correctly. My question is will this cause turbulence in the larger chamber so that the air from the Yellow Question mark area is being pulled and mixed with the air from the intake area? Is there an equation I can use to know the best depth range to test the set of the smaller chamber at? I understand I am going to have to build protypes and get my Dr. Tyson on. I just like to set parameters so I do not have to build more units than necessary. Arrows are air flow. So air is drawn in the over lay, up the heat sink, in the heat sink, into the chamber, then out the exit tube.

I mainly want to know if this will help cool the heated area faster by drawing more heat from causing turbulence in the chamber, as apposed to the exit tube being flush with the end of the chamber.

Thank you all I hope I made it clear what I'm asking.
You asked if there was an equation used to determine turbulence in flow and there is one. You might want to look into the Reynolds Number. https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/reynolds-number-d_237.html
 

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