Cristaline structure: simple solid state physics problem

In summary, the conversation discusses finding the distance between two atoms in a unit cell of Nickel, given its atomic mass and density at 90ºC. The solution involves finding the number of atoms per cm³ and using the information to determine the length of the unit cell and the distance between atoms. However, this requires knowing the type of unit cell, which can be found by researching the crystal structure of Nickel.
  • #1
Jalo
120
0

Homework Statement



The atomic mass of Niquel is 58.7 amu (atomic mass unit), and it's density (at 90ºC) is 8.86 g/cm³.

(a) Find the distance from one atom to the closest one from him.

Homework Equations



1 amu = 1.66053*19⁻²⁷

The Attempt at a Solution



I started by finding the number of atoms per cm³, N:

[itex]N = \frac{8.86*10^{24}}{1.66053} = 5.3356*10^{24} atoms/cm^{3}[/itex]

This is where I lose myself. Am I supposed to solve this without knowing the type of unit cell? If I knew it, since I know the number of atoms per cell, I would be able to get the length of the side of the unit cell, and from there I could work out the distance between two atoms next to each other.

Is there a way to solve this without knowing the unit cell before hand? Or am I supposed to solve it by searching the correct unit cell and following the line of thought I wrote?
Thanks ahead.
D.
 
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  • #2
Jalo said:

Homework Statement



The atomic mass of Niquel is 58.7 amu (atomic mass unit), and it's density (at 90ºC) is 8.86 g/cm³.

(a) Find the distance from one atom to the closest one from him.

Homework Equations



1 amu = 1.66053*19⁻²⁷

The Attempt at a Solution



I started by finding the number of atoms per cm³, N:

[itex]N = \frac{8.86*10^{24}}{1.66053} = 5.3356*10^{24} atoms/cm^{3}[/itex]

This is where I lose myself. Am I supposed to solve this without knowing the type of unit cell? If I knew it, since I know the number of atoms per cell, I would be able to get the length of the side of the unit cell, and from there I could work out the distance between two atoms next to each other.

Is there a way to solve this without knowing the unit cell before hand? Or am I supposed to solve it by searching the correct unit cell and following the line of thought I wrote?
Thanks ahead.
D.

You can browse for "Crystal structure of Nickel" or see the Periodic Table http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Periodic_table_(crystal_structure)

When calculating the number of atoms in 1 cm3, you have to consider the atomic mass of Nickel. Your result is wrong.

ehild
 

Related to Cristaline structure: simple solid state physics problem

What is a crystaline structure?

A crystaline structure is a characteristic arrangement of atoms, ions, or molecules in a solid material. It is a highly ordered, repeating pattern that gives a solid its unique physical properties.

Why is understanding crystaline structure important in solid state physics?

Understanding crystaline structure is important in solid state physics because it helps us understand and predict the physical, mechanical, and electrical properties of materials. It also allows us to design and engineer materials with specific properties for various applications.

What factors influence the crystaline structure of a material?

The crystaline structure of a material is influenced by its chemical composition, temperature, pressure, and the way it is cooled or formed. These factors affect the arrangement and bonding of atoms or molecules in the material, leading to different crystaline structures.

How is crystaline structure determined experimentally?

Crystaline structure can be determined experimentally through techniques such as X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and neutron scattering. These methods allow us to analyze the arrangement of atoms or molecules in a material and determine its crystaline structure.

What are the different types of crystaline structures?

The three main types of crystaline structures are cubic, tetragonal, and hexagonal. These structures can further be classified into different subtypes, such as simple cubic, body-centered cubic, and face-centered cubic, based on the arrangement of atoms or molecules within the unit cell of the crystal.

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