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De Broglie wavelength of a tennis ball

  1. Dec 8, 2014 #1
    This is a multiple choice question.
    The de Broglie wavelength of a moving tennis ball is calculated as 1x10^-33. This means that the moving tennis ball
    A)Diffracts through a narrow slit.
    B)Does not behave as a particle
    C)Does not display wave properties
    D)Is travelling at the speed of light

    The answer is C and I know this through the process of elimination however, I do not conceptually understand why it is. Can someone please explain?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 8, 2014 #2

    Bystander

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    What's the momentum?
     
  4. Dec 8, 2014 #3
    Wavelength= Plank's constant/Momentum
    Therefore rearranging the equation
    (6.63x10^-34)/(1x10^-33)=0.663
     
  5. Dec 8, 2014 #4

    Bystander

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    ... and, the mass of a tennis ball?
     
  6. Dec 8, 2014 #5
    lol We don't know the mass. This is a multiple choice but the mass of a tennis ball, in general, is about 58 grams.
     
  7. Dec 8, 2014 #6

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    With that mass is it anywhere near light speed?
     
  8. Dec 8, 2014 #7
    Ahhhh I see! I didn't think of that. Thank you :).
     
  9. Dec 8, 2014 #8

    Bystander

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    Good --- that take care of things for you?
     
  10. Dec 8, 2014 #9
    Yep. Thanks :D
     
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