Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Derivation of Minkowski norm of the four-momentum

  1. Jan 16, 2016 #1
    I have attached a derivation of the Minkowski norm of the four-momentum but just don't quite see how the writer arrived at ## -m^2 c^2 ## from what was given. How exactly does this quantity follow from ## -\frac {E^2}{c^2} + p^2##? I feel like it might be very obvious, so any explanation would be great!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 16, 2016 #2

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    I would say that it is a definition rather than a derivation. We use the norm of the four momentum often enough that it deserves a name, so we define the name "mass" to refer to it.
     
  4. Jan 19, 2016 #3
    Guys ....is it so that every physical quantity is related to time????
    like ....acceleration is rate of change in the velocity of an object over time....similar is for velocity n power.........but what abt other..........

    cuz simply p=mv .........i dont get it.......but ...by equating ....p=mv n F=ma......we can get F=p/t.........n cant get this as well.....

    plz sombody helppppp........m a 11th class student n cant go further if i cant get the basics clearly.......plzzz
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Derivation of Minkowski norm of the four-momentum
  1. Four forces (Replies: 4)

Loading...