Determine the net charge of sphere C

In summary, three identical metal spheres, A, B, and C, with charges of -9q, +3q, and neutral respectively, undergo a series of touch and separation processes. When A and B touch, they transfer charge and become net negative at -3q each. When A then touches C, C becomes more negative and A more positive, but they do not neutralize. Finally, when C touches B, it acquires a net charge of -2.25q. The unit for q is unspecified.
  • #1
isukatphysics69
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Homework Statement


Consider three identical metal spheres: Sphere A carries a charge of -9q, Sphere B carries a charge of +3q, and Sphere C is neutral.

Spheres A and B are touched together and then separated.

Next, Sphere C is touched to Sphere A and then separated from it.

Finally, Sphere C is touched to Sphere B and then separated from it.

What is the final net charge on Sphere C? Express your answer with the appropriate +/- sign and use q as the unit.

Homework Equations


None

The Attempt at a Solution


When sphere A and B touch, they will transfer charge to each other, and since sphere C is neutral it has no effect on this transfer. A and B are now net negative because of the dominant -9 net charge on sphere A

Sphere A & B are now -3q each

now sphere A touches sphere C and B is net negative polorizing the transfer process, so sphere A at -3q touching neutral sphere C with the polorizing effect of sphere B is going to make it so that sphere C becomes more negative and sphere A becomes more positive, they will not neutralize, correct? now I am confused how I should put a number on the spheres after this process
 
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  • #2
I think the problem wants you to consider sphere B far away when A touches C so that it does not influence the charge transfer process. What happens when a sphere with -3q charge touches a sphere with zero charge?
 
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  • #3
kuruman said:
I think the problem wants you to consider sphere B far away when A touches C so that it does not influence the charge transfer process. What happens when a sphere with -3q charge touches a sphere with zero charge?
Hey, I actually just got it on the first try which almost never happens I am so happy lol the answer is -2.25q. I also have no idea what unit a q is
 

Related to Determine the net charge of sphere C

1. How do you determine the net charge of sphere C?

To determine the net charge of sphere C, you need to know the total number of protons and electrons present on the surface of the sphere. The net charge is the difference between the number of protons and electrons.

2. What is the unit of measurement for net charge?

The unit of measurement for net charge is Coulomb, which is represented by the symbol "C".

3. Can sphere C have a net charge of zero?

Yes, sphere C can have a net charge of zero if the number of protons and electrons on its surface are equal. This means that the positive and negative charges cancel each other out.

4. Is the net charge of sphere C affected by its size?

No, the net charge of sphere C is not affected by its size. It depends solely on the number of protons and electrons present on its surface.

5. How can you determine the net charge of sphere C experimentally?

To determine the net charge of sphere C experimentally, you can use an electroscope or a charge detector. These devices can measure the amount and type of charge present on the surface of the sphere.

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