Distance under constant acceleration

In summary, a body with an acceleration of 11m/s² started from rest and after 6 seconds, its velocity is 66m/s. It traveled a distance of 198m. The formula used was d=vt, which represents displacement under constant acceleration. Displacement and distance are the same in this case. Another formula that could be used is d=(1/2)at2, which gives the same solution. It can be shown that v(average)*t = (1/2)at2.
  • #1
Alpha[X]²
21
0
A body starts from rest with an acceleration of 11m/s².

What is it's velocity after 6 seconds. (I got 66 for that) and how far did it travel?

What forumla do I have to use for this?
 
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  • #2
There is a well-known expression which represents displacement under constant acceleration. Try to find it. (Either here or google it up.)
 
  • #3
Is displacement the same as distance?
 
  • #4
Alpha[X]² said:
Is displacement the same as distance?

Yes it is, in this case.
 
  • #5
What about the first part of the question?

I tried to average out the velocity and then using the d=vt formula I got 198m.
 
  • #6
Alpha[X]² said:
What about the first part of the question?

I tried to average out the velocity and then using the d=vt formula I got 198m.

Yes, you did it correctly. Remember that you could calculate the displacement averaging out the velocity only because the acceleration is constant.

The other formula would be: d = (1/2)at2. Check that the solution is the same.

Try to show that v(average)*t = (1/2)at2
 
Last edited:

What is distance under constant acceleration?

Distance under constant acceleration refers to the total distance traveled by an object while undergoing a constant acceleration. This means that the rate of change of the object's velocity remains constant throughout its motion.

How is distance under constant acceleration calculated?

The distance under constant acceleration can be calculated using the equation d = 1/2at^2, where d is the distance, a is the acceleration, and t is the time.

What are the units for distance under constant acceleration?

The units for distance under constant acceleration are typically in meters (m).

Can distance under constant acceleration be negative?

Yes, distance under constant acceleration can be negative if the object is decelerating or moving in the opposite direction of its initial motion.

What is the relationship between distance and time under constant acceleration?

The relationship between distance and time under constant acceleration is directly proportional. This means that as the time increases, the distance traveled also increases, assuming the acceleration remains constant.

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