Do multiple WiFi devices create areas of high EMR?

In summary, the conversation discusses the potential for constructive interference of WiFi devices in a typical house or office and whether this could lead to exceeding safe power levels. However, it is noted that commercial devices do not operate at levels close to the limits and the oscillators are not phase locked, resulting in a random sum of waves. Therefore, there is no need to worry about this type of interference.
  • #1
ChrisXenon
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TL;DR Summary
Do they constructively interfere to create local high spots?
I'm thinking in a typical house or office, areas of constructive interference may exist which aggregate the fields of maybe 10 WiFi devices.
Wouldn't this mean the safe power levels stipulated for any single device would be routinely be exceeded? And if so, do we care?
 
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  • #2
They are not stationary, so interference will never sit still in one spot.

The simpler answer, is don't worry.
 
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  • #3
ChrisXenon said:
I'm thinking in a typical house or office, areas of constructive interference may exist which aggregate the fields of maybe 10 WiFi devices.
Sure. When modeling the exposure, the safest assumption would be to assume they are additive (always constructively interfering).
Wouldn't this mean the safe power levels stipulated for any single device would be routinely be exceeded? And if so, do we care?
No. Commercal home/office devices don't operate at power levels anywhere close to the limits. They are several orders of magnitude too weak:
https://www.fcc.gov/general/radio-frequency-safety-0
 
  • #4
anorlunda said:
They are not stationary,
Moreover, the oscillators in all the devices are not phase locked so the resulting phasor addition of a number of sources will only ever give you a random-looking product with an RMS value that's the sum of the source waves; no identifiable peaks and troughs, (un?)fortunately.
 
  • #5
Excellent - thank you both.
 

Related to Do multiple WiFi devices create areas of high EMR?

1. What is EMR and how is it related to WiFi devices?

EMR stands for electromagnetic radiation, which is a type of energy that is emitted by electronic devices such as WiFi routers. WiFi devices use radio waves to transmit data, which is a form of EMR.

2. Can multiple WiFi devices in one area create high levels of EMR?

Yes, multiple WiFi devices in one area can create high levels of EMR. Each device emits its own EMR, and when there are multiple devices in close proximity, the levels of EMR can add up and create an area of high EMR.

3. Is high EMR harmful to humans?

There is currently no scientific evidence to suggest that the levels of EMR emitted by WiFi devices are harmful to humans. The levels of EMR emitted by these devices are considered to be within safe limits set by regulatory agencies.

4. How can I reduce the levels of EMR in my home or office?

To reduce the levels of EMR in your home or office, you can try the following:

  • Keep your WiFi devices at a distance from where you spend most of your time.
  • Turn off WiFi devices when not in use.
  • Use a wired internet connection instead of WiFi.
  • Consider using a WiFi router with lower EMR emissions.

5. Are there any health risks associated with long-term exposure to EMR from WiFi devices?

There is currently no scientific evidence to suggest that long-term exposure to EMR from WiFi devices poses any health risks. However, it is always a good idea to limit your exposure to any type of radiation, including EMR, as a precautionary measure.

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