Do you think my dog has wolf blood in her (DNA testing)

  • Thread starter Pleonasm
  • Start date
  • #1
322
18
My supposed malamute/golden eyes (75-25%)


_20180629_113910.JPG

Wolf eyes...
wolf-eyes.jpg


My dog again..

_20180629_122205.JPG


She exhibits several signs of characteristic wolf behavior including hypersensitivity to stimulus, is extremely skittish etc

Would you bet she has 5-10% actual wolf blood in her when the results are in?
 

Attachments

Last edited:

Answers and Replies

  • #2
322
18
Another thing, other dogs, including american pitbulls, freak out when she gets dominant on them, if a fights break out. I have never seen those breed afraid or back down from anything. I'm talking about at least 3 occasions where these breeds freaked out.
 
  • #3
Vanadium 50
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Education Advisor
26,422
9,934
What does "wolf blood" mean? Does your dog share genes with wolves? Certainly. Your dog shares genes with yeast.
 
  • Like
Likes DennisN and russ_watters
  • #4
322
18
What does "wolf blood" mean? Does your dog share genes with wolves? Certainly. Your dog shares genes with yeast.
The same wolf blood found in crossings between dogs and wolfes. Are you suggesting wolf blood is undetectable?
 
  • #5
1,758
1,093
You might wanna' google up 'wolfdog'. If you think it is 5-10% (third or fourth generation) then it is practically irrelevant, especially for a malamute.
However, expectations based on a DNA test might have a bad impact on your relations with your dog. Unless there are problems (which cannot be corrected by training) such tests are quite meaningless.
 
  • #6
322
18
You might wanna' google up 'wolfdog'. If you think it is 5-10% (third or fourth generation) then it is practically irrelevant, especially for a malamute.
However, expectations based on a DNA test might have a bad impact on your relations with your dog. Unless there are problems (which cannot be corrected by training) such tests are quite meaningless.
It would explain the behavior described. What do you think based on the pictures and gut feeling?
 
  • #7
1,758
1,093
What do you think based on the pictures and gut feeling?
I think you are overthinking and overdoing this. Alpha dominance (both for males/females) is not exquisite to wolfs/wolfdogs, it happens to regular dogs as well.
As for the pictures - with dogs (and actually with any other pets) the first thing to learn is to forget (about the fur) and concentrate on behaviour.

Ps.: I have a gut feeling that originally Grumpy was a happy cat
 
  • Like
Likes russ_watters
  • #8
322
18
I think you are overthinking and overdoing this. Alpha dominance (both for males/females) are not exquisite to wolfs/wolfdogs, it happens to regular dogs as well.
As for the pictures - with dogs (and actually with any other pets) the first thing to learn is to forget (about the fur) and concentrate on behaviour.
I have consulted both Malamute and Golden Retriever breeders. Her hypersensitivity is not typical at all for either one. I want verification that it is indeed a 75-25% mix of Alaskan Malamute and Golden Retriever. I strongly doubt that is the case.
 
  • #9
322
18
I think you are overthinking and overdoing this. Alpha dominance (both for males/females) is not exquisite to wolfs/wolfdogs, it happens to regular dogs as well.
As for the pictures - with dogs (and actually with any other pets) the first thing to learn is to forget (about the fur) and concentrate on behaviour.
It's very rare for a "game" fighting dog breed provoking my dog, to retreat and show genuine fear, left shaking in the grass. The owner started to cry and thought mine was going to kill it.
 
Last edited:
  • #11
322
18
Well, it's actually not popular to have an 'alpha' fighting dog.
And being an 'alpha' is not about muscles or breed... (sorry :sorry:)
Does it sound 100% doggy to you? I can't walk with her in a crowded city with noise. She almost collapses from the stimulus. Even a group of marathon joggers freak her out (lol)
 
  • #12
russ_watters
Mentor
20,279
6,860
The same wolf blood found in crossings between dogs and wolfes. Are you suggesting wolf blood is undetectable?
I think the point is that "wolf blood" isn"t a "thing". Where did you get that term? What do you think it means?

Genetically, YOU are about 80% wolf. So what does that tell us?
 
  • Like
Likes BillTre and Vanadium 50
  • #13
Nugatory
Mentor
13,246
6,128
Does it sound 100% doggy to you? I can't walk with her in a crowded city with noise. She almost collapses from the stimulus. Even a group of marathon joggers freak her out (lol)
Sounds a lot like our dog, who is a boxer/basset/lab/chow mix by DNA testing.

"100% doggy" covers a very wide range of behaviors. Consider how wide a range of physical characteristics you would accept as 100% dog - from cocker spaniel to Saint Bernard. The span between the behavior you're describing and mellow-mutt behavior isn't any greater.

Do not underestimate the effect of early training/socialization either. A dog that is not exposed to a high-stimulus environment from an early age is unlikely to adjust happily to such an environment as an adult.
 
  • Like
Likes BillTre
  • #14
322
18
I think the point is that "wolf blood" isn"t a "thing". Where did you get that term? What do you think it means?

Genetically, YOU are about 80% wolf. So what does that tell us?
Is wolf blood relatively recent in the family tree detectable or not?
 
  • #15
322
18
Do not underestimate the effect of early training/socialization either. A dog that is not exposed to a high-stimulus environment from an early age is unlikely to adjust happily to such an environment as an adult.
Do you think I would ask these questions if that was the case? I keep asking myself each time I make threads, why people by default assume complete idiocy. I mean really. Common now.
 
  • #16
322
18
Let's hypothesize for argument sake that I cross a purebred dog with a pure grey wolf, then conduct a DNA test. Would this test confirm the direct 50% wolf line blood or not?
 
  • #17
russ_watters
Mentor
20,279
6,860
Is wolf blood relatively recent in the family tree detectable or not?
Again: what do you think "wolf blood" means?
 
  • #18
322
18
Again: what do you think "wolf blood" means?
A recent crossing between a wolf and a dog.
 
  • #19
russ_watters
Mentor
20,279
6,860
Let's hypothesize for argument sake that I cross a purebred dog with a pure grey wolf, then conduct a DNA test. Would this test confirm the direct 50% wolf line blood or not?
So by "wolf blood" you really mean recent cross breeding. So could you please stop using the unscientific term "wolf blood"?

The answer, though, is probably yes: a DNA test could probably identify a recent cross-breeeding in the ancestors.
 
  • #20
322
18
So by "wolf blood" you really mean DNA overlap. Great. So could you please stop using the unscientific term "wolf blood"?

The answer, though, is probably yes: a DNA test could probably identify a recent cross-breeeding in the ancestors.
And just for fun sake, what would you guess is the case here going by the pictures and the description given? Do you think there is a recent crossbreeding at play here? If you had a gun to your head, what would you guess?
 
  • #21
322
18
The answer, though, is probably yes: a DNA test could probably identify a recent cross-breeeding in the ancestors.
Why only probably?
 
  • #22
322
18
So by "wolf blood" you really mean recent cross breeding. So could you please stop using the unscientific term "wolf blood"?

.
Which scientific term do you propose I use instead? The DNA structure of a given animal is constituted by blood.
 
  • #23
russ_watters
Mentor
20,279
6,860
And just for fun sake, what would you guess is the case here going by the pictures and the description given? Do you think there is a recent crossbreeding at play here? If you had a gun to your head, what would you guess?
I'm not a "dog person", but I would guess no. Some dogs are hyper and/or don't obey/play well with others. An ex of mine has a Boston terrier that gave such a hyper response to the slightest stimulus that she occasionally fainted! Apparently, that's just their "thing".
 
  • #24
russ_watters
Mentor
20,279
6,860
Which scientific term do you propose I use instead?
Recent cross-breeding or ancestry.
The DNA structure of a given animal is constituted by blood.
That sentence really doesn't make sense. DNA is the genetic coding in your cells. It has nothing, specifically, to do with blood.

I think there is a colloquial usage of similar terms like "bloodline" that is used in fiction media ("he has king's blood") to describe associations on a family tree. I'm not sure if it was actually used historically or what people who used it thought it meant.

All living things are literally relatives of each other and a lot of potentially interesting, yet unscientific and largely meaningless things can be said about the associations. E.G. if you are willing to go back enough generations, you could say everyone has "king's blood" and "wolf's blood" and "yeast's blood" even though yeast doesn't have blood.
 
  • #25
322
18
Recent cross-breeding or ancestry.
Is there recent cross-breeeding in my dog? Why not: is there recent wolf DNA in my dog?
 

Related Threads on Do you think my dog has wolf blood in her (DNA testing)

Replies
18
Views
6K
Replies
31
Views
10K
Replies
4
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • Last Post
2
Replies
34
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
19
Views
2K
Replies
7
Views
959
  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
996
  • Last Post
Replies
21
Views
4K
Replies
7
Views
2K
Top