Does arteries / veins have nociceptors?

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  • Thread starter algis.j
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In summary: Otherwise they would just be seen as another cell and ignored.Thanks for the clarification :)In summary, it seems that the answer to whether or not arteries and veins have nociceptors is unknown. However, if small, transparent robots were inserted into the circulatory system, it's possible that the individual may occasionally "feel" them.
  • #1
algis.j
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Does arteries / veins have nociceptors?

i.e.:if an army of 'nanobots' ramble in my circulatory system; would I occasionally "feel" them??

Thank you :)
 
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  • #2


Nociceptors seem to be mainly associated with epithelia (although there are nociceptors in muscle and joint tissue), so I would guess no. OTOH, if they crossed the slit diaphragm into the glomerulus and renal nephron (which is epithelia), you may feel them.

Sounds like the beginning of a bad R01 application...
 
  • #3


Thank you :)

Sounds like the beginning of a bad R01 application...

Why "bad"?
 
  • #4


Andy Resnick said:
Nociceptors seem to be mainly associated with epithelia (although there are nociceptors in muscle and joint tissue), so I would guess no.
Vasculature is lined by epithelial cells too, though.

But, I'm not sure. The only thing that comes to mind that might help toward answering this question is that there are some drugs that give a burning sensation when administered i.v., though this is pretty rare.

On the other hand, when I think little nanotech stuff administered into circulation, I presume it would be designed so it isn't non-specifically attaching to receptors, so only the potential for bumping mechanoreceptors would be an issue (something that responds to pressure or touch rather than chemical binding). I don't think such a receptor would be present inside blood vessels, otherwise people developing blood clots my have more of a warning of their presence before they blocked off circulation to some part of the body.
 
  • #5


algis.j said:
Thank you :)
Why "bad"?

because it's based on pure speculation- the nanobots do not exist.
 
  • #6


Moonbear said:
Vasculature is lined by epithelial cells too, though.
<snip>.

Are you sure? I thought it was endothelial cells.
 
  • #7


I would guess you have a better chance of feeling the effects rather than the bots themselves.
However, the real answer would have to do with how small the bots are and what they are designed to do.
Your blood vessels are filled with little biological machines. You don't normally notice them.
I'll explain. Cells can be considered machines in that they perform a function. And they do it independantly for the most part. Some perform more complicated funtions than others. White blood cells are almost independant entities. Scouring the body for stuff that doesn't belong and then removing it. (Sounds like a nanobot to me)

You don't feel white blood cells in your body (unless they aren't working properly) so I wouldn't imagine you would feel nanobots.

But you might feel the changes they make. Inflamation being one sign of white blood cells attacking things they shouldn't.
Similar reactions might be noticable for Nanobots.
Particularly if they had an affinity for something like nerve cells. (Or a particular type of fat used to line nerve cells)
 
  • #8


Thank you.

They would have to be 'transparent' tho; for the immune system.
 

Related to Does arteries / veins have nociceptors?

1. Do arteries and veins have nociceptors?

Yes, both arteries and veins have nociceptors, which are sensory nerve cells that respond to harmful or potentially harmful stimuli, such as pain or inflammation. These nociceptors are found throughout the body, including in blood vessels.

2. What is the role of nociceptors in arteries and veins?

The role of nociceptors in arteries and veins is to detect and respond to potential damage or danger in these blood vessels. When stimulated, nociceptors send signals to the brain, which can trigger pain or other protective responses to prevent further injury.

3. Can nociceptors in arteries and veins cause pain?

Yes, nociceptors in arteries and veins can cause pain. When these nociceptors are activated, they send signals to the brain, which can be interpreted as pain. This pain can be a warning sign of potential damage or inflammation in the blood vessels.

4. Are nociceptors in arteries and veins involved in cardiovascular diseases?

Yes, nociceptors in arteries and veins can be involved in cardiovascular diseases. Chronic activation of these nociceptors can contribute to the development of diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and vasculitis. Inflammation and pain caused by nociceptor activation can also worsen these conditions.

5. Can nociceptors in arteries and veins be targeted for pain relief?

Yes, nociceptors in arteries and veins can be targeted for pain relief. Certain medications, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and nerve blockers, can target these nociceptors and reduce pain and inflammation in the blood vessels. Other treatment options, such as acupuncture and physical therapy, can also target nociceptors and provide pain relief.

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