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Does Ice evaporate?

  1. Sep 12, 2008 #1
    Greetings, I was curious to know if ice evaporates. I suspect it does to a very slight degree but to what degree I am not sure. It likely depends on a plethora of factors, from ice temperature, outside temperature, humidity, sunlight, wind, etc. So if you have any leads for me I'd appreciate it, thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 12, 2008 #2

    turbo

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    Google "sublimation"
     
  4. Sep 28, 2008 #3
    NO, 0 degrees Celcius is the freezing point of water and the melting point of Ice. Snow and Ice must be above 0 degrees celcius to melt to water and then the water will start to evaporate.
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    Stephanieluis
     
  5. Sep 29, 2008 #4

    matthyaouw

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    By definition, evapouration is the conversion of a liquid to vapour so technically no, but yes sublimation does occur.
     
  6. Sep 29, 2008 #5
    at a certain pressure and a certain temperature, ice will nearly instantly change from the solid state to the gas state. I recommend looking at water's phase graph and see where on the graph it would happen. I believe the y axis is pressure and x axis is temperature. The graph should be divided into 3 regions, liquid, gas and solid. Look for the border between solid and gas and that is the region where sublimation occurs
     
  7. Sep 29, 2008 #6
    Look up a "phase diagram" for water. See the point where the three lines meet? The region on the top left is where water's a solid (cold, high pressure). Top right is liquid (warmer, normal pressure). Bottom right is gas (warm, low pressure).

    If you're at such a low pressure and cold temperature that you start off below the point where the lines meet (and you're still a solid), and you keep your pressure constant as you heat it up..you'll make the water go into sublimation without becoming a liquid.
     
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