Does Standing on a Chair & Jumping Affect the Force Felt by the Floor?

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In summary, the force felt by the floor would be the same whether the person bends their knees or not upon landing. This is due to Newton's 2nd law, where the energy felt by the body is absorbed by the muscles and the floor experiences an equal and opposite force. However, bending the knees allows for a longer amount of time for the force to act, resulting in a lower peak force. This may result in less pain for the person upon landing. The terms "total force" may refer to impulse or energy.
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If a person is standing on a chair and jumps off, does the floor feel the same force whether the person bends their knees or not?

I suspect the floor feels the same force regardless, as the energy felt by the body is absorbed by the muscles, but the floor feels the same equal and opposite force. I see this as Newtons's 2nd law. thanks!
 
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Then there wouldn't be much point in bending your knees!

The force on floor depends on your mass and how quickly you stop F = ma
By bending your knees your legs act like a spring and allow you to stop more gradually - since the deceleration is less, the force on the floor and so on you is less
 
  • #3
The floor would feel the same total force regardless of weather you bent your knees or not as you land on the floor. The key factor here is time. If you bend your knees when you land there is less force felt on the floor for a longer time. If you don't bend your knees there is a larger force felt on the floor for a very short time. Albeit some might argue that the resulting pain from such an endeavor would be felt for quite some time afterwards.
 
  • #4
The total energy into the floor is the same - but the peak force is less.
 
  • #5
MrScience101 said:
The floor would feel the same total force regardless of weather you bent your knees or not as you land on the floor.

What on Earth do you mean by total force? Perhaps impulse or maybe energy are the words you're looking for?

And the force would definitely be reduced. The initial momentum and energy would be the same, but the force would act over a longer amount of time thus the force would be reduced.
 

1. How does standing on a chair and jumping affect the force felt by the floor?

When you stand on a chair and jump, you are exerting a downward force on the chair and the floor. This is due to the force of gravity acting on your body. This force is then transferred to the floor, causing it to experience an increase in the force it feels.

2. Does the height of the chair make a difference in the force felt by the floor?

Yes, the height of the chair can affect the force felt by the floor. The higher the chair, the greater the distance the force of gravity has to act on your body, resulting in a higher force being exerted on the floor when you jump.

3. Is the force felt by the floor the same for everyone when standing on a chair and jumping?

No, the force felt by the floor can vary for different individuals. Factors such as weight, muscle mass, and jumping technique can all affect the force exerted on the floor when jumping from a chair.

4. How does the type of flooring impact the force felt by the floor when standing on a chair and jumping?

The type of flooring can have an impact on the force felt by the floor. Softer or more flexible flooring, such as carpet or foam, may absorb some of the force and result in a lower force being felt by the floor compared to a hard, rigid surface like concrete.

5. Is there a maximum force that can be felt by the floor when standing on a chair and jumping?

Yes, there is a maximum force that can be felt by the floor when standing on a chair and jumping. This is due to the limitations of the human body and the laws of physics. The maximum force can vary depending on individual factors and the height and type of chair being used.

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