Does the moon orbit as a classical particle?

  • #1
Big_Tubbz
Thread moved from a technical forum, so homework template missing
The moon orbits Earth at a radius of 3.84E8 m. To do so as a classical particle, its wavelength should be small. But small relative to what? Being a rough measure of the region where it is confined, the orbit radius is certainly a relevant dimension against which to compare the wavelength. Compare the two. Does the Moon indeed orbit as a classical particle? (MEarth=5.98E24 kg and MMoon=7.35E22 kg)

I know I need to use De Broglies equation but I don't know what it means by "compare the two". How do I compare the moon's matter wavelength to its orbit? And how do I, from this determine whether it orbits as a classical particle?

Relevant equations: λ=h/(mv), F=mv^2/r, F=GMm/r^2

Do I solve for V and then use that in the wavelength equation? How does that tell me how small it is in relation to the orbit.

v=sqrt(GM/r) λ=h/(m*sqrt(GM/r))
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
DrClaude
Mentor
7,503
3,782
You have two values, the orbit radius and the wavelength, which have the same units. Are they the same order of magnitude? Do they differ by a small factor (2? π?). Or is one incredibly small compared to the other?
 

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