Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Does the theory of polynomials say something about their coefficients?

  1. May 23, 2007 #1
    Hello! I have just a small question - does the theory of polynomials say something about their coefficients? I mean: is the polynomial with all the coefficients being imaginary still considered as a "normal' polynomial?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 23, 2007 #2

    NateTG

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    In some sense, it's possible to have polynomials over any mathematical object where multiplication and addition is defined. So, for example, one might have a polynomial over the real numbers (a.k.a. a real polynomial), over the complex numbers (a complex polynomial), the integers mod 17, or 7x7 matrices. When in doubt, it is always safe to specify what type of object is being operated with.

    The notion of "normal" is basically a result of context. Real and complex polynomials are both very common. The others are more exotic.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Does the theory of polynomials say something about their coefficients?
Loading...