Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Does theoretical have good prospects?

  1. Jul 4, 2010 #1
    i am starting do be very interested in theoretical physics, if i specialised in this for a degree, would that be a good thing?, i mean surely most physics and tech jobs require mainly experimental skills?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 4, 2010 #2
    Yeah, most jobs want more practical skills, but at least you get the ladies.
     
  4. Jul 4, 2010 #3

    MathematicalPhysicist

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I can't hold off the attention from the groupies, I am ****ing rockstar. (-:
     
  5. Jul 4, 2010 #4
    isn't telling someone you are a physicist a conversation killer?
     
  6. Jul 4, 2010 #5
    Not if someone is a physicist :)
     
  7. Jul 4, 2010 #6
    Wait, why is that? I think telling someone that you are a detective is a conversation killer
     
  8. Jul 4, 2010 #7
    There are hundreds of these threads, do a search. This topic comes up almost daily - in my eyes one cannot specialize as a theoretical physicist at undergraduate level. The basics are the same for theory and experimental physics. You will study the same thing.

    At post-graduate level, it involves different approaches to the same topics. This is when it matters. Either way, you'll learn valuable skills that have applications in the workplace.

    And, re: your quesiton about needing experimental skills in the workplace - no. Experimental physics isn't what any undergraduates seem to think it is. It's about using real-world data. Very rarely do experimental physicists sit in a lab building experiments - it doesn't really happen that way any more. At undergraduate, it's all the same thing really - in a 'theoretical course' you'll do more maths , the difference just about ends there.
     
  9. Jul 4, 2010 #8
    Thanks
     
  10. Jul 4, 2010 #9
    interesting, could you expand on how topics are approached differently?
     
Share this great discussion with others via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook