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Does time stopping at c explain spooky action at a distance?

  1. Jan 14, 2010 #1
    Does time "stopping" at c explain spooky action at a distance?

    My thinking is this:
    We know that two interacting photons will adjust their spins relative to each other.
    We know that if one of these photons change their spin at some time in the 'future', the other photon will instantaneously adjust it's spin relative to the original photon.
    Since photons travel at c, at which speed time doesn't 'move', isn't is possible that the two photons are effectively still interacting or continuously interacting with each other?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 18, 2010 #2
    Re: Does time "stopping" at c explain spooky action at a distance?

    Opinion: time does not "move" in the first place. Material objects in a real universe move and in order to describe the movement we need the concept of time.
    When time "stops"...it is not being stopped by anything..what you are effectively saying is that "point" where there is no motion in the universe.
    What about light waves themselves? Their motion is unique in the universe..their speed is not relative to anything...as are material objects in the universe that produce events in our universe.
    Note: photons could have a "pre-ordained" relationship to each other...the future "entanglement" could be the result of a former relationship.
    Gorn
     
  4. Jan 18, 2010 #3
    Re: Does time "stopping" at c explain spooky action at a distance?

    I think he means to say that in the Minowski metric equation

    c2dT2=c2dt2+dx2 , where dx2 is in the direction of motion,

    as dx2->c2dT2, dt2->0 , so any ammount of proper time corresponds to zero coordinate time, seem from an observer moving slower than c.
     
  5. Jan 18, 2010 #4

    ZapperZ

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    Re: Does time "stopping" at c explain spooky action at a distance?

    No. The experiment is done in lab frame, and it is in this frame that we detect the non-locality effect, NOT in the photon's frame.

    Zz.
     
  6. Jan 19, 2010 #5
    Re: Does time "stopping" at c explain spooky action at a distance?

    Can you explain this phenomena in detail please? It may help others who read this thread and it would seem that it greatly applies to the work I'm doing. You say that one photon will spin in relation to another, at what distance is this observed? And what do you mean by a future spin, if they spin up at the same time does that imply any effect on time or affected by time?

    -Devin
     
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