Does Voltage Between Phase and Neutral Determine Current Flow Direction?

The voltage is between one phase and neutral. Does it mean that the current flows from the phase line to neutral?- Emily: What do voltage and current mean in terms of fundamental definitions?- Warren: Household wiring uses alternating current. For half of the cycle, the voltage is higher on the hot line than on neutral, and thus current flows from hot to neutral. For the other half of the cycle, the voltage is lower on the hot line than on neutral, and thus current flows from neutral to hot.In summary, voltage is the pressure that causes the flow of current, similar to water pressure and fluid flow. In household wiring, alternating current flows from hot to neutral during one half of the cycle and from neutral to hot during the
  • #1
linda123
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The voltage is between one phase and neutral. Does it mean that the current flows from the phase line to neutral?

What do voltage and current mean in terms of fundamental definitions?
 
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  • #2
Household wiring uses alternating current. For half of the cycle, the voltage is higher on the hot line than on neutral, and thus current flows from hot to neutral. For the other half of the cycle, the voltage is lower on the hot line than on neutral, and thus current flows from neutral to hot.

Voltage is analogous to water pressure; current is analogous to the fluid flow caused by a difference in pressure.

- Warren
 
  • #3


Voltage and current are fundamental concepts in electricity and are related to each other through Ohm's Law. Voltage is a measure of the potential difference between two points in an electrical circuit, while current is the flow of electric charge through a conductor.

In terms of the given question, the voltage being between one phase and neutral means that there is a potential difference between these two points. This can be visualized as a "push" or force that drives the flow of electrons. However, the direction of current flow is not determined by the voltage alone. It is also dependent on the resistance of the conductor and the direction of the electric field.

In most cases, current will flow from a higher voltage point to a lower voltage point. So, in this scenario, if the neutral line has a lower voltage compared to the phase line, then the current will flow from the phase line to the neutral line. However, if the neutral line has a higher voltage, then the current would flow in the opposite direction.

Overall, voltage and current are interrelated and cannot be fully understood without considering other factors such as resistance and electric field direction.
 

Related to Does Voltage Between Phase and Neutral Determine Current Flow Direction?

1. What is the difference between voltage and current?

Voltage refers to the potential energy difference between two points in an electrical circuit, while current is the flow of electric charge through a conductor. In simpler terms, voltage is the force that pushes the current through a circuit.

2. How are voltage and current related?

According to Ohm's Law, voltage (V) is equal to the product of current (I) and resistance (R). This means that the higher the voltage, the greater the current will be, as long as the resistance remains constant.

3. What are the units of voltage and current?

Voltage is measured in volts (V), while current is measured in amperes (A), also known as amps. Other common units for voltage include millivolts (mV) and kilovolts (kV), and for current, milliamperes (mA) and kiloamperes (kA).

4. How is voltage and current affected by the type of material in a circuit?

The type of material used in a circuit can affect the voltage and current in different ways. For example, conductors have low resistance, allowing for a higher current to flow through, while insulators have high resistance, limiting the flow of current. The type of material also affects the voltage drop, which is the decrease in voltage as current flows through a material.

5. What is the difference between AC and DC voltage and current?

AC (alternating current) voltage and current change direction periodically, while DC (direct current) voltage and current flow in one direction. AC is commonly used in household electricity, while DC is used in batteries and electronic devices. The units and formulas for calculating AC and DC voltage and current are the same, but their effects on electrical components can differ.

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