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Double-slit experiment of Young

  1. Mar 26, 2006 #1

    ntk

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    What will we see on the screen in double-slit experiment if I use two radiation have wavelength l_1 and l_2 . I know there will be two systems of interference fringe, call I and II. But what if one light region of I is coincident one dark region of II ?
    And then how many light regions do we see on the screen ?
    Have to say that I've never do this experiment :frown:

    Is it a very stuppid question ?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 27, 2006 #2

    andrevdh

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    Homework Helper

    Very interesting question. It is investigations like these that teach us more about nature. The double slit experiment is basically an interaction between matter (the double slit) and photons (the monochromatic light). Investigations of such seems to indicate that the photons motion is determined by the slits, that is where the photon diffracted is determined by the presence of the slits. The statistical distribution of the photons in the pattern depends on the wavelength and the distance between the slits.
     
  4. Mar 27, 2006 #3

    daniel_i_l

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    Gold Member

    Actually, if white light, which contains all the wavelengths of the spectrum, is shined at a set of double slits, you will see all of the colors on the screen(behind the slits) because each color(wavelength) is strongest at a different distance from the center.
     
  5. Mar 30, 2006 #4

    ntk

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    Thank you very much.
    Actually, the problem i have to solve is to determine number of light regions if i use two monochromatic lights in the double-slit experiment
     
  6. Mar 30, 2006 #5

    andrevdh

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    What do you mean by the number of light regions? Bright bands per unit distance?
     
  7. Mar 30, 2006 #6
    Use the diagram here :
    Young's Double Slit

    Should help you sort it out.
     
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