Double slit problem with glass block

In summary,Homework Equations:lambda=yd/mLwherey= place on y-axis of screend= distance between two slitsm=diffraction orderL= distance of slits from screenandperiod=1/frequencylambda=v/fFor the first problem, I plugged in the known values into the first equation and got an answer of 3.0 mm. For the second problem, I manipulated some variables in the bottom two equations to get a fraction of a period. I am not stuck on the last two. For c, I started by dividing 1.0m/600E-9m to get
  • #1
Sarah Hallsway
3
0

Homework Statement


Light of wavelength 600 nm passes through two slits separated by 0.20 mm and is observed on a screen 1.0 m behind the slits. The location of the central maximum is marked on the screen and labeled y=0.

(I only need help on the last 2 parts, but I will list all of them in case information from them is needed to complete the last parts.)

a. At what distance, on either side of y=0, are the m=1 bright fringes?

b. A very thin piece of glass is then placed in one slit. Because light travels slower in glass than in air, the wave passing through the glass is delayed by 5.0x10^-16 s in comparison to the wave going through the other slit.
What fraction of the period of the light wave is this delay?

c. With the glass in place, what is the phase difference, [delta phi][/0], between the two waves as they leave the slits?

d. The glass causes the interference fringe pattern on the screen to shift sideways. Which way does the central maximum move (toward or away from the slit with the glass) and by how far?

Homework Equations


lambda=yd/mL
where
y= place on y-axis of screen
d= distance between two slits
m=diffraction order
L= distance of slits from screen

and
period=1/frequency

lambda=v/f

The Attempt at a Solution


For the first problem, I plugged in the known values into the first equation I provided, and got an answer of 3.0 mm. For the second problem, I manipulated some variables in the bottom two equations to get a fraction of a period.

I am not stuck on the last two. For c, I started by dividing 1.0m/600E-9m to get how many wavelengths ahead one light beam is from the other. That value was 1.6E6. I took this to mean that without the glass, this value represented how far ahead the wave is from the other. However, without being given the thickness of the glass, I do not know how to take it into account.

For d, I am having a similar problem, since the thickness of the glass is unknown. Logically, I would imagine that the fringes would move away from the slit with the glass, since the glass has a higher n value than air does. To solve this problem, I drew a triangle from the two slits to the fringes, but could not find enough known values to calculate y.

Any help is appreciated. Thank you!
 
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  • #2
Sarah Hallsway said:
For c, I started by dividing 1.0m/600E-9m
You are asked about the phase difference caused by the glass. Why would the distance from there to the screen be relevant?
 
  • #3
What is the distance the "unencumbered" wave has traveled from the slit when
the wave that was delayed by 5 * 10 E-16 sec emerges from its slit?
What fraction of a wavelength is this?
How does this affect the geometry at the slits?
 

Related to Double slit problem with glass block

FAQs about Double Slit Problem with Glass Block

1. What is the double slit problem with glass block and why is it significant?

The double slit problem with glass block is a thought experiment that demonstrates the wave-particle duality of light. It involves passing a beam of light through a glass block with two parallel slits, creating an interference pattern on a screen. This phenomenon is significant because it challenges our understanding of light as either a wave or a particle and highlights the need for a more complex understanding of quantum mechanics.

2. How does the double slit problem with glass block relate to the wave-particle duality of light?

The double slit problem with glass block shows that light can exhibit wave-like behavior, such as interference, even when it is thought to behave like a particle. This supports the concept of wave-particle duality, which states that particles, like photons of light, can exhibit characteristics of both waves and particles.

3. Can the double slit problem with glass block be explained by classical physics?

No, the double slit problem with glass block cannot be explained by classical physics. The classical theory of light, which views light as a wave, cannot account for the behavior observed in this experiment. It is only through the principles of quantum mechanics that we can understand the results of the double slit problem.

4. How does the distance between the two slits affect the interference pattern in the double slit problem with glass block?

The distance between the two slits plays a crucial role in the interference pattern observed in the double slit problem with glass block. The closer the slits are, the wider the interference pattern will be, while a greater distance between the slits will result in a narrower pattern. This is due to the wave nature of light and the diffraction of the light passing through the slits.

5. What other phenomena can be demonstrated using the double slit problem with glass block?

The double slit problem with glass block is not limited to just demonstrating the wave-particle duality of light. It can also be used to illustrate other concepts in quantum mechanics, such as superposition and entanglement. Additionally, the experiment can be replicated with other particles, such as electrons, to further explore the wave-particle duality in different systems.

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