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Drawing illustrations (schemes) for Physics problems

  1. Jul 28, 2007 #1
    What program should I use for drawing schemes (illustrations) in physics problems and how can I draw sin, cos, sin^2 e.t.c. graphs for my notes? Thank's in advance.
     
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  3. Jul 28, 2007 #2

    mjsd

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    computer programs?
    there should be plenty out there for free downloads just google it
    professional software such as Matlab, Mathematica are great if you have them
     
  4. Jul 28, 2007 #3
    Thank's my friend for the answer but I need an easy and not so complicated program (i.e. to draw a spring or as I said some curves)
     
  5. Jul 28, 2007 #4

    Danger

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    Welcome to PF, Alex.
    I use Illustrator (currently CS version) for everything. To simplify things, I've started a 'library' file. When I have to draw something that's a bit difficult, such as a drill bit or a spring, I save a copy of it to the library. The next time I need one, I just paste a copy from the library into the current project and then manipulate it as necessary (scale, orientation, whatever).
    I also have an extensive collection of public-domain clip art which can be used in the same manner.
    Any vector-drawing programme such as CorelDraw, KeyDraw!, or the like should work the same way. It does not work for bit-map programmes such as Paint.
    One drawback of Illustrator CS (which previous versions didn't have) is that it can't output a file format that ImageShack recognizes. To post something in PF, I have to open it in Photoshop and then save it as a TIF file for uploading. I don't know if the other softwares that I mentioned have that limitation.
     
  6. Jul 28, 2007 #5
    Thank's DANGER. Illustrator is too expencive for me. Is it possible to tell me where to find " the extensive collection of public-domain clip art" that you mentioned above? Maybe I will find something there.
     
  7. Jul 28, 2007 #6

    Gokul43201

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  8. Jul 28, 2007 #7

    Danger

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    I have Corel Image Gallery II, which my nephew gave me, but the big one is from IMSI which I bought on eBay. Both are CD's. The IMSI one has 1,200,000 each of clip-art and web-art images, 100,000 photos, and 5,000 each of fonts and sounds. The purchase includes a 1 year subscription to Clipart.com.
    There are also free clip-art sites all over the net. Just Google for what you want. Keep in mind as well that if you are using images only for yourself, you can take any image at all from the net. You just can't redistribute it without the copyright holder's consent.
     
  9. Jul 28, 2007 #8
    Paintshop Pro is another good program (and cheaper than Illustrator)

    If you need free, try searching sourceforge.net. There may be something suitable there.
     
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