Earth as an energy source & sink

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of Earth as an energy source and sink, with some suggesting that the Earth absorbs electrons from space and can also discharge them to distant plants. The idea of the Earth acting as a large capacitor and sending energy in different forms, both recoverable and unrecoverable, is also mentioned. The conversation ends with a suggestion to explore the topic further.
  • #1
dsky
dear Physicists

An important thing that I had to clear my mind of is that of the energy
balance here on Earth itself, so my question is :

1. Is it correct to generalize that KE, NucE, Heat that drives the
plant came from the Earth ( as an E source) and that its final form
elctrical E can be discharge directly to Earth or soil ( assuming no
load ) as part of the energy balance law ( Earth as an E sink).

Some say that Earth abosorbs electrons from space, if this true, then
it can be said the same for electrons coming from power lines short
circuiting to the Earth or that of lightning.

from there I can make another conclusion that :

2. The Earth is a big neutrally charged capacitor that electricity
coming to it one point will be counter acted or neutralized (
dissipated at that point)
but by law of E conserv. It will "discharge" electrons to the
distant plant, increasing currents inside the generator coils creating
counter magnetic fields forcing opposite torque to shaft.

Here it can be seen that the Earth is sending energy which transforms
into different forms: recoverable - EME, KE and unrecoverable -Heat
 
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  • #2
im not a physicist but i must comment
you have an interesting thought here. are you suggesting that the energy discharged into our planet Earth is "counter acting" the EM fields we live in that keep us from being burned to a crisp?
and where is all this electricity going?-is it powering the EM field?
i thought moving molten lava produced a EM field.
i am interested in your idea. it is interesting.

i also suggest you look at my thread (slightly related to yours)
https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=142760
 
  • #3
.

Dear reader,

The concept of Earth as an energy source and sink is a complex one, and there are many factors that contribute to the energy balance of our planet. It is not entirely accurate to generalize that all forms of energy on Earth come from the Earth itself. While the Earth does produce some forms of energy, such as geothermal energy, the majority of the energy on Earth comes from external sources, such as the Sun.

The Earth can be considered an energy sink in the sense that it absorbs and stores energy from various sources, including the Sun, and releases it in different forms, such as heat. However, it is also important to note that the Earth is constantly exchanging energy with its surroundings, so it is not a closed system. This means that the Earth is not solely responsible for the energy balance, and other factors such as the Sun and the atmosphere play a significant role as well.

Regarding your first question, it is not entirely accurate to say that all forms of energy on Earth come from the Earth itself. While some forms of energy, such as geothermal energy, do originate from the Earth, others, such as nuclear energy, come from external sources. Additionally, while the Earth can act as a sink for electrical energy, it is not the only source or sink for this form of energy. Electrical energy can also be generated and consumed by various processes and systems, such as power plants and electrical devices.

As for your second question, it is true that the Earth does absorb electrons from space, as well as from sources such as lightning and power lines. However, it is important to note that these electrons are not necessarily being "discharged" to distant plants. The movement of electrons is a complex process, and the Earth's role in it is not as straightforward as simply acting as a neutralizing capacitor.

In conclusion, while the Earth does play a role in the energy balance of our planet, it is not the sole source or sink for all forms of energy. It is important to consider the contributions of external sources and other factors in understanding the complex energy dynamics of our planet. I hope this helps clarify your understanding of Earth as an energy source and sink.
A physicist.
 

Related to Earth as an energy source & sink

1. What is Earth's role as an energy source and sink?

Earth acts as both a source and sink for energy in our solar system. It receives energy from the sun in the form of solar radiation, which is then absorbed and reflected by the Earth's surface and atmosphere. This energy is then used to power various natural processes and human activities on Earth.

2. How does Earth maintain a balance between energy input and output?

Earth maintains a balance between energy input and output through a process known as the energy balance. This involves the exchange of energy between the Earth's surface, atmosphere, and space. The Earth's surface absorbs and reflects solar radiation, while the atmosphere traps and redistributes some of this energy. The remaining energy is radiated back into space.

3. What are some examples of Earth's energy sources?

The main sources of energy on Earth include solar radiation, geothermal energy, and tidal energy. Solar radiation, as mentioned before, is the primary source of energy for our planet. Geothermal energy is heat stored within the Earth's crust, which can be harnessed for various purposes. Tidal energy is generated by the gravitational pull of the moon on the Earth's oceans.

4. How does Earth act as a sink for energy?

Earth acts as a sink for energy by absorbing and storing excess energy from the sun and other sources. This energy is then released through various processes, such as the water cycle, photosynthesis, and ocean currents. Earth also serves as a sink for carbon, which is absorbed by plants and the oceans, helping to regulate the Earth's climate.

5. How does human activity affect Earth's role as an energy source and sink?

Human activity has a significant impact on Earth's role as an energy source and sink. The burning of fossil fuels and deforestation, among other human activities, contribute to an increase in greenhouse gases, which trap more heat in the Earth's atmosphere. This disrupts the natural energy balance and leads to global warming. Additionally, human activities such as harvesting energy from natural resources can also affect the Earth's energy balance and have long-term consequences on its role as an energy source and sink.

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