Easier to get programmer or engineer jobs with Physics/Math BS?

In summary, the individual graduated with BS degrees in Physics and Applied Math, but took a leave of absence from their Physics PhD program. They are now looking for jobs, and have had a few interviews for engineering positions, but did not enjoy the hands-on work involved. They are considering applying for mechE-related jobs, but have also been studying programming on their own for the past few months. However, they have struggled with technical interview questions and are unsure if they are applying for the right jobs. They are wondering if they need more time to study before having a chance at programmer jobs, or if they have a better chance at engineering jobs that do not involve hands-on work.
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I graduated with BS degrees in Physics and Applied Math and I then enrolled in a Physics PhD program. However, I took a leave of absence and am now looking for jobs

I think I've only gotten a couple interviews for engineering positions, which were computer engineering/EE-related, but it seemed to involved lots of hands-on work, which I really hate since I always did poorly in my physics lab courses. For example, I hate doing the stuff that mechanics, machinists, and welders do

Anyway, I'm trying to figure out how to apply for jobs. I am obviously not a typical applicant for engineering or programming jobs. I've took a few mechE courses in undergrad, in heat transfer and fluid mechanics. Should I just forget about trying to get mechE-related jobs involving modeling/simulation (such as FEA, CFD)?

As for programming, I've been self-studying data structures/algorithms, learning about web development like javascript, and practicing programming for the past few months. When I was in college, I naively assumed that it would be relatively easy to get programmer jobs with a BS in physics/math because I worked on a physics project using C++. But as I've now spent a lot of time studying programmer interview questions, it seems there's an endless amount of knowledge questions and technical problems I need to know. I was contacted by a recruiter at Google, but it seems like I'm so behind that it's pointless to even try. I can solve basic problems like reversing a string, implementing a linked list, or converting a sorted array into a binary tree. But I just learned about stacks/queues a few weeks ago

It's been much easier for me to get interviews immediately for programmer/developer jobs (at smaller companies) than other engineering positions. But I've always bombed the interviews by being unable to solve really basic problems or not having completed enough prior projects. I also haven't written code on large repositories with different code-bases

Am I applying for the wrong jobs? Do I need to spend maybe another year studying before I have a chance at programmer jobs? Do I have a better shot at engineering jobs (hopefully not involving hands-on work) than programmer jobs?
 
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I'm sorry you are not finding help at the moment. Is there any additional information you can share with us?
 

Related to Easier to get programmer or engineer jobs with Physics/Math BS?

1. How does having a Physics or Math BS degree make it easier to get programmer or engineer jobs?

Having a Physics or Math BS degree shows employers that you have a strong foundation in quantitative and analytical skills. This is highly valued in the fields of programming and engineering, as these roles often require individuals to work with complex data and problem-solving. Additionally, these degrees demonstrate proficiency in critical thinking and attention to detail, which are crucial skills in these professions.

2. What specific skills from a Physics or Math BS degree are relevant to programming and engineering jobs?

A Physics or Math BS degree equips individuals with skills such as mathematical modeling, data analysis, and critical thinking. These skills are highly applicable to programming and engineering jobs, as they involve working with complex algorithms, data structures, and problem-solving. Additionally, the ability to think logically and analytically is essential in both of these fields.

3. Do programming and engineering jobs require a specific type of Physics or Math BS degree?

No, most programming and engineering jobs do not require a specific type of Physics or Math BS degree. However, certain subfields within these professions may require a more specialized degree. For example, a degree in applied mathematics may be more relevant for a data science role, while a degree in theoretical physics may be more suitable for a research and development position.

4. How can I leverage my Physics or Math BS degree to stand out in the job market?

One way to stand out in the job market with a Physics or Math BS degree is to highlight your relevant coursework and projects on your resume. Additionally, gaining hands-on experience through internships or research opportunities can make you a more competitive candidate. Networking with professionals in the field and showcasing your problem-solving skills during job interviews can also help you stand out.

5. Are there any additional skills I should acquire to increase my chances of getting programmer or engineer jobs with a Physics or Math BS degree?

While a Physics or Math BS degree can make you a strong candidate for programming and engineering jobs, having additional skills such as programming languages, data analysis software, or project management experience can further increase your chances. It is also beneficial to continuously learn and stay updated on new technologies and developments in the field to make yourself more marketable to potential employers.

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