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Einstein and his theory of light speed

  1. Nov 3, 2013 #1
    Einstein theorized that if you were to go the speed of light or even faster then the light around you would become paralyzed. But if you're going that fast then the light wouldn't be able to catch up to you, so technically wouldn't the light around you would become black because the light cannot catch up to you.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 3, 2013 #2

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    No massive object can travel at any speed equal or greater than the speed of light.
     
  4. Nov 3, 2013 #3
    actually it can, what would be preventing it form going that fast? space has no friction or air friction to prevent an object form exceeding that speed
     
  5. Nov 3, 2013 #4

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    There are a couple of things. The first is that it would require an infinite amount of energy to accelerate a massive object to c. So that prevents an object from reaching c from any v<c. This has been verified in particle accelerators on a daily basis. No matter how much energy we pump into a particle it still remains at some v<c.

    The second is a little more technical, but explains why a massive particle cannot simply start out at v>c. A massive particle has a timelike four-momentum by definition, and a timelike four-momentum implies a timelike four-velocity. All timelike four-velocities correspond to v<c.
     
  6. Nov 3, 2013 #5

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    MODERATOR'S NOTE:

    Several posts in this thread have been deleted. Please keep the discussion factual, courteous, and helpful.
     
  7. Nov 3, 2013 #6

    Akaisora

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    Gold Member

    Last edited: Nov 3, 2013
  8. Nov 3, 2013 #7

    russ_watters

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    Staff: Mentor

    This is wronger than just as pertains to special relativity: friction has nothing to do with anything. It is mass (inertia) that resists acceleration via f=ma.
     
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