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Electric field by a current carrying wire

  1. Feb 15, 2012 #1
    Aside from magnetic field, Does a wire carrying current induce also an electric field? If yes, what rule should i use to find its direction?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 15, 2012 #2

    Dick

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    Does a wire carrying a current have a net electric charge? What do you think?
     
  4. Feb 15, 2012 #3
    Yes, so negative charges go one way, and positive charges go another direction. Isn't it?
     
  5. Feb 15, 2012 #4

    Dick

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    The picture is usually that negative charges (the electrons) go one way and the positive charges (the atoms that have lost an electron) are fixed in a metal. But there's no reason to assume there are more of one than the other. If there is a net charge then you can't compute it from the current. No, there is no electric field that you can figure out from just knowing the current.
     
  6. Feb 15, 2012 #5
    1. If there are the same number of positive charge and negative charge, then there's no net charge, and thus no electric field?
    2. Can i say since a constant current has a magnetic field that doesn't change, so an electric field is not induced?
    3. If the number of positive charge and negative charge are not the same, there is a net charge, then is there an electric field?
    4. does a static current same as a constant current?

    Thanks a lot!
     
  7. Feb 16, 2012 #6

    Dick

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    1. That's what Gauss' law would say. 2. A constant current creates a constant magnetic field - but that's not why the electric field is zero. 3. If the wire has a net charge, there will be an electric field. 4. I don't know what "static current" means - the only way I can think of the interpret it is "constant current".
     
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