Electric field inside a charged conductor placed in free space.

In summary, when a conductor is under electrostatic conditions, excess charge always resides on the surface to maintain a zero electric field inside. This is consistent with Gauss's Law. However, the charge may not be distributed uniformly on the surface, as there is a higher density near sharp edges and corners. In the case of a spherical shell with a hole, the electric field inside may not be exactly zero, but it would be close to zero if the hole is small. For a star-shaped hollow conductor, the electric field inside would be zero under electrostatic conditions.
  • #1
rohit dutta
19
0
It is true that under ELECTROSTATIC CONDITIONS, excess charge on a conductor always resides on the surface of the conductor because if they were inside it, there would be an electric field inside the conductor which would set the free electrons into motion. They distribute uniformly over the surface thereby making the electric field inside the conductor zero( Consistent with Gauss's Law ).

Now, I take a spherical metal shell, which has a hole( considerable size ) on the surface and I spray some charge on it. Do you think the electric field inside the conductor will be zero?
 
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  • #2
The charge is not necessarily distributed uniformly on the surface. If the conductor is not spherical, there's more charge density near sharp edges and corners of the surface. If you have a charged spherical cap (a sphere with a hole in it), there is a higher charge density around the hole than on other areas.

I don't think the electric field inside a charged spherical cap is exactly zero, but if the hole is small it would be very close to zero.
 
  • #3
If I consider a star shaped hollow conductor( closed ) and I place some charge on it, the electric field inside the conductor would be zero( under electrostatic conditions ).
 

Related to Electric field inside a charged conductor placed in free space.

1. What is an electric field inside a charged conductor?

The electric field inside a charged conductor is the force per unit charge exerted on a small test charge placed inside the conductor. It is a measure of the strength of the electric force experienced by the test charge due to the presence of the surrounding charges in the conductor.

2. How is the electric field inside a charged conductor affected by the charge on the conductor?

The electric field inside a charged conductor is directly proportional to the charge on the conductor. This means that as the charge on the conductor increases, the electric field inside it also increases.

3. Is the electric field inside a charged conductor uniform?

Yes, the electric field inside a charged conductor is always uniform. This means that the magnitude and direction of the electric field are the same at all points inside the conductor.

4. Can the electric field inside a charged conductor ever be zero?

Yes, the electric field inside a charged conductor can be zero if the conductor is in electrostatic equilibrium. This means that there is no net movement of charges within the conductor and the electric field is canceled out by the charges on the surface of the conductor.

5. How does the shape and size of a charged conductor affect the electric field inside it?

The shape and size of a charged conductor do not affect the electric field inside it, as long as the conductor is in electrostatic equilibrium. This is because the charges on the surface of the conductor distribute themselves in such a way that the electric field inside remains uniform.

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