Electric field inside a charged insulator

In summary, the conversation discusses finding the electric field outside as a function of x using the equation EA = Qenclosed / epsilon. The participants also mention that the electric field is linear from x = 0 to x = d/2, with a value of \rho*d/2\epsilon_{0} at x = d/2 and a value of 0 at x = 0. There is also a question about the equation that expresses this relationship.
  • #1
Oblivion77
113
0

Homework Statement


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Homework Equations



EA = Qenclosed / epsilon

The Attempt at a Solution



I found the electric field outside to be [tex]\rho*d/2\epsilon_{0}[/tex]. Not sure if that helps, I don't know what to do since it says "as a function of x"
 
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  • #2
You know it's going to be linear from x = 0 to x = d/2, and at d/2 you know what it is and at 0 it's 0. So ...
 
  • #3
Hmm i am not sure I follow. I understand its linear from x = 0 to x = d/2 and at d/2 its the same as Eout?
 
  • #4
That's what it looks like to me.

So what equation expresses that?
 

Related to Electric field inside a charged insulator

1. What is an electric field inside a charged insulator?

The electric field inside a charged insulator is a force field that exists within the material due to the presence of electric charges. It is a vector quantity, meaning it has both magnitude and direction, and is measured in units of volts per meter (V/m).

2. How is the electric field inside a charged insulator calculated?

The electric field inside a charged insulator can be calculated using the equation E = Q/εA, where E is the electric field strength, Q is the total charge on the insulator, ε is the permittivity of the material, and A is the area of the insulator. This equation assumes a uniform distribution of charge within the insulator.

3. Does the electric field inside a charged insulator change if the insulator is placed in different environments?

Yes, the electric field inside a charged insulator can change depending on the surrounding environment. This is because the permittivity of the material, which is a measure of how easily it can be polarized by an external electric field, can vary in different environments. For example, the electric field inside a charged insulator will be stronger in a vacuum compared to inside a material with a high permittivity, such as water.

4. Can the electric field inside a charged insulator be zero?

Yes, the electric field inside a charged insulator can be zero if the total charge on the insulator is zero. In this case, there are no electric charges present to create an electric field. Additionally, if the insulator is in a symmetric arrangement, such as a spherical shell, the electric field inside will also be zero due to cancellation of the electric field vectors.

5. What is the significance of the electric field inside a charged insulator?

The electric field inside a charged insulator is significant because it affects the behavior of electric charges within the material. For example, the strength of the electric field can determine the amount of electric force experienced by a charged particle inside the insulator. It also plays a role in determining the capacitance of the insulator, which is a measure of its ability to store electrical energy.

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