Electric field inside a Superconductor

In summary, the conversation discussed the topic of superconductivity, specifically the property of having a zero electric field inside the material. This is deduced from the equation ##\mathbf j = \sigma \mathbf E## and the experimental evidence that ##\sigma \rightarrow \infty## for superconductors. The question was raised about the effect of an external time-varying electric field on this property, to which the response was that it may not be exactly zero but close enough for most purposes. The conversation concluded with a reference to Admiral Grace Hopper's statement about the speed of light and the importance of considering the size and frequency of the conductor.
  • #1

dRic2

Gold Member
883
225
TL;DR Summary
Is electric field inside a superconductor always zero ?
I was reading chapter 3 of this book https://blackwells.co.uk/bookshop/product/Superconductivity-by-James-Arnett/9780198507567, which is a brief introduction to superconductivity. It is stated that inside a superconductor the Electric filed is always zero. This is deduced from the equation ##\mathbf j = \sigma \mathbf E## and taking as an experimental evidence that ##\sigma \rightarrow \infty## for a superconductor (page 51).

What if I apply an external time-varying electric field ? Is ##\mathbf E## still zero ? It would be like the electrons instantaneously move to adapt to the new field... Is is possible ?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Not exactly, but way close enough for most things. Speed of light.
Never forget Admiral Grace Hopper's admonition the a foot corresponds to a nanosecond so unless your conductor is large or frequency high no worries
 
  • #3
Thanks, just wanted to be sure because the author refers to this property various times in the next pages to prove stuff.
 

Suggested for: Electric field inside a Superconductor

Replies
0
Views
936
Replies
1
Views
990
Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
783
Replies
6
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
994
Replies
6
Views
1K
Back
Top