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Electric field with reference to voltage

  1. Feb 1, 2010 #1
    If E=-∇V, does it mean that negative voltage emits positive electric field, and positive v negative ef?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 2, 2010 #2

    sophiecentaur

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    It's basically a matter of definition.
    I think you can look at it this way: The field between a positive plate and a negative plate is said to be directed towards the negative plate (the direction in which a positive charge would move) but the positive plate has a positive potential with respect to the negative plate i.e. voltage increases in the opposite direction to the direction of the force on a positive charge.
     
  4. Feb 2, 2010 #3
    you see I have this question where youre give an equation for potential deference of 10-5z^2, so E= -10z right?, anyway there is a field on one side of the slab (slab is the material with a charge) and it asks about EF on both sides, ie what is EF on right hand side and left hand side. As a hint there is "watch the sign" statement. So I am really confused o_O
     
  5. Feb 2, 2010 #4

    ZapperZ

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    That is not what the Grad means! It is the CHANGE in potential over a distance, i.e. a gradient. In 1 dimension, it is E = -dV/dx.

    Zz.
     
  6. Feb 3, 2010 #5
    Yeah and d(10-5z^2)/dz=-10z, am I correct?
     
  7. Feb 3, 2010 #6

    sophiecentaur

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    Uh?

    If you want a simple explanation for the sign, the field points towards the negative side and away from the positive. i.e. a negative slope as distance towards the positive increases - hence the negative sign.
    Note. A field isn't "emitted".
     
  8. Feb 3, 2010 #7
    Ok thanks a lot sophiecentaur, and yeah i know field isnt emitted, thats why i used "emitted" not emmited;) thanks guys
     
  9. Feb 3, 2010 #8

    sophiecentaur

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    It was terminology I was referring to - not spelling:wink:
     
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