Electric potential at point from origin

  • Thread starter rlaulusa
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  • #1
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Homework Statement


In the presence of a uniform electric field, E=-6.0 i + .8 j + 3.42 k N/C, assume that the electric potential is -5V at the origin of the coordinate system, and determine the electric potential at the point 2.7 i -2.7 k.


Here's what I've done so far
[tex]\Delta[/tex]V=V(2.7, 0, -2.7) - V(0, 0, 0,) = [tex]\int[/tex]Eds
=-([tex]\int[/tex][tex]^{2.7}_{0}[/tex]Exdx + [tex]\int[/tex][tex]^{0}_{0}[/tex]Eydy + [tex]\int[/tex][tex]^{-2.7}_{0}[/tex]Ezdz)
=-([tex]\int[/tex]-6.9dx + [tex]\int[/tex].8dy + [tex]\int[/tex]3.42dx)
=3.48 V

But I don't think this is correct. We did a problem similar to this in class where we had to define the path we were taking, but I wasn't sure how to do that in this problem.

Thanks!

Homework Statement





Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution

 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
gneill
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The field is stated to be uniform, so the potential should change uniformly per unit distance in a given direction. A straight path from the origin p0 = (0,0,0) to your destination p1 = (2.7,0,-2.7) should do nicely, with the change in potential being given by the dot product E dot (p1 - p0). Don't forget to include the given starting potential at the origin. You should also state the units of measure for the distances!
 

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