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Electric Potential within a Vector.

  1. Jan 28, 2006 #1
    Hi everyone, this is my first shot at posting here. I'm looking for a way to attack this problem and needless to say i just cant figure it out. Here is the problem.

    A charge of +16.1 µC is located at (4.40 m, 6.02 m) , and a charge of -12.8 µC is located at (-4.50 m, 6.75 m) . What charge must be located at (2.23 m, -3.01 m) if the electric potential is to be zero at the origin?

    If anyone can give some thoughts on how i should proceed with this, would be greatly appreciated.:bugeye:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 28, 2006 #2
    Just treat the two as vectors, one positive one negative, and add them together. Reverse the sign of the vector you get and that's what you need to balance the equation.
     
  4. Jan 28, 2006 #3
    The electric potential obeys the superposition principle.
     
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