Energy Transformation equation for a free fall

In summary, the discussion was about a lab where the energy transformation equation for a free fall was measured. The equation is Total Energy = Potential gravitational energy + Kinetic energy, and it is demonstrated that total energy is conserved through the use of equations for height and velocity over time.
  • #1
jman1114
3
0
One of the discussion questions in a lab I did which was basically a free falling object where the kinetic and potential energies were measured. It asks what is the energy transformation equation for a free fall (1-step transformation).
Is it just:
Total Energy = Potential gravitational energy + Kinetic energy
Et= mgh + mv2/2

Then just cancel out the mass or am I going in the total wrong direction with this?
 
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  • #2
Total energy is conserved, which means that mgh + 1/2 mv^2 = C, where C is a constant. Use the equations for h(t) and v(t) for a free fall and plug them into the energy equation to convince yourself that energy is constant for every moment t.
 
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  • #3


Your equation is correct! The energy transformation equation for a free fall is indeed:

Total Energy = Potential gravitational energy + Kinetic energy
Et = mgh + mv^2/2

In this equation, "m" represents the mass of the object, "g" represents the acceleration due to gravity, "h" represents the height of the object, and "v" represents the velocity of the object.

This equation shows the conversion of potential energy, which is the energy an object has due to its position, into kinetic energy, which is the energy an object has due to its motion. As the object falls, it loses potential energy but gains kinetic energy.

It is important to note that this equation assumes that there is no air resistance acting on the object. In real-life situations, air resistance can affect the object's motion and the energy transformation equation would be more complex.

Overall, your understanding and application of the energy transformation equation for a free fall is correct. Well done!
 

Related to Energy Transformation equation for a free fall

1. What is the energy transformation equation for a free fall?

The energy transformation equation for a free fall is E = mgh, where E represents energy, m represents mass, g represents the acceleration due to gravity, and h represents the height of the object.

2. How does the energy transformation equation for a free fall relate to potential and kinetic energy?

The energy transformation equation for a free fall shows the relationship between potential and kinetic energy. When an object is at a height h, it has potential energy (mgh). As the object falls, this potential energy is converted into kinetic energy (1/2mv²). At the bottom of the fall, all of the potential energy has been transformed into kinetic energy.

3. Does the energy transformation equation for a free fall take into account air resistance?

No, the energy transformation equation for a free fall assumes that there is no air resistance. In reality, air resistance can affect the speed and energy of an object in free fall, but it is often negligible for objects with small mass and short distances of free fall.

4. Can the energy transformation equation for a free fall be used for objects with varying mass?

Yes, the energy transformation equation for a free fall can be used for objects with varying mass. However, it is important to note that the acceleration due to gravity (g) is the same for all objects in free fall regardless of their mass.

5. How is the energy transformation equation for a free fall used in real-world applications?

The energy transformation equation for a free fall is used in many real-world applications, such as calculating the energy generated by a falling object in hydroelectric power plants or determining the potential and kinetic energy of a roller coaster at different points in its track. It is also used in physics experiments to study the relationship between potential and kinetic energy.

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