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Engineering Science at U of T

  • #26
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are you saying that ryker is right and i shouldn' t do eng sci?
Where did I say that, by the way?
 
  • #27
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I don't know if you understand the reality of being a physicist but like most people that come on this forum wanting to become physicists they have a romanticized perception of what being a physicist is like. Firstly you'll have your standard university schooling. After that, with a BSc. in Physics, you'll be almost unemployable (the only possible jobs you'll get are graduate programs, financial analysts and systems engineers (not likely)). It will be almost necessary for you to go on into graduate studies, studying something that will likely be useless to society unless you are studying condensed matter physics. In that case, once you finish your PhD, you'll be approximately 26 years old, unemployed and concentrated so narrowly that people won't want to hire you do to a lack of industrial experience. Your 28 now, hanging on to post-docs hoping to become and assistant professor and to eventually get tenure, you now wish that you realized that you'll likely only get tenure if you make significant contributions during your post-docs or by the time your 35 years old. This is a route taken by many physicists, I'm not trying to be harsh but many people don't understand the facts, they just think: "I'll study physics because I enjoy it and I want to learn more about the universe around us." The knowledge in physics is always available and you can gain it later with a few hundred dollars in charges from your local library, which you can now afford since you've gone a different route. I'd suggest that you stay with the engineering path (although Eng Sci is very overwhelming and not worth the outcome (lower GPA, competing for some jobs as regular engineering students with higher GPAs)), physics is always there to unlock during your life, a university degree is a marketable characteristic and an engineering degree is far more accessible and employable.

Good luck!
 
  • #28
Where did I say that, by the way?
i dunno, i don't understand what that guy was saying....lolol
 
  • #29
I don't know if you understand the reality of being a physicist but like most people that come on this forum wanting to become physicists they have a romanticized perception of what being a physicist is like. Firstly you'll have your standard university schooling. After that, with a BSc. in Physics, you'll be almost unemployable (the only possible jobs you'll get are graduate programs, financial analysts and systems engineers (not likely)). It will be almost necessary for you to go on into graduate studies, studying something that will likely be useless to society unless you are studying condensed matter physics. In that case, once you finish your PhD, you'll be approximately 26 years old, unemployed and concentrated so narrowly that people won't want to hire you do to a lack of industrial experience. Your 28 now, hanging on to post-docs hoping to become and assistant professor and to eventually get tenure, you now wish that you realized that you'll likely only get tenure if you make significant contributions during your post-docs or by the time your 35 years old. This is a route taken by many physicists, I'm not trying to be harsh but many people don't understand the facts, they just think: "I'll study physics because I enjoy it and I want to learn more about the universe around us." The knowledge in physics is always available and you can gain it later with a few hundred dollars in charges from your local library, which you can now afford since you've gone a different route. I'd suggest that you stay with the engineering path (although Eng Sci is very overwhelming and not worth the outcome (lower GPA, competing for some jobs as regular engineering students with higher GPAs)), physics is always there to unlock during your life, a university degree is a marketable characteristic and an engineering degree is far more accessible and employable.

Good luck!
yes i kind of am romanticizing physics
in fact, i am really jealous of those smart people studying things that i don't even know
I am jealous of those people who uses complicated equations and symbols to solve mysteries of our world

However, i absolutely hate the process of getting employed, working for someone else's company that will never be mine
my father did small business of his own, he was really stressed with it, whether he was earning enough money to send me out to canada and get me a canadian citizenship
(which is a big accomplishment from a poor family he is from)
nonetheless, he is retiring from his job in an early age, he always says that he doesn't enjoy what he is doing.

It might be just me, but i have a negative thoughts on business
and technically, engineers are business people.
I can't imagine myself doing a job interview making presentation on what our companies future aspect would be like
i just hate it i don't exactly know why
even if i get employed at a very well known company, i would rather choose a job where i get to do my own research, write my theories or teach students.

though like you said i might be romanticizing all this

What i want to do in my life is study, have a pet doggy, enjoy musical life (as i love singing in choir and playing violin, piano, french horn, I am learning bass guitar and drum from my friend ..off topic lol) and have a great life with friends and family
and i don't need a lot of money ,,,unless i have a kid ,,, which i am not considering as a factor now,,,cuz i don't think i will get married,,, off topic again
lololololol and its not like i shop every month, or would like a nice car
though nice house wouldn't be bad...:) what am i gibbering about lol

yeah thx for listening to my whiny story
 
  • #30
I am actually very interested about this program. But I see that Mechanical Engineering isn't listed as an option to major in the last two years. Is Mechanical engineering disguised as a major option under a different name. Or does one end up learning mechanical engineering in the first two years ? Or if I'm interested in MechE is it better to just do the regular program.
 
  • #31
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I am actually very interested about this program. But I see that Mechanical Engineering isn't listed as an option to major in the last two years. Is Mechanical engineering disguised as a major option under a different name. Or does one end up learning mechanical engineering in the first two years ? Or if I'm interested in MechE is it better to just do the regular program.
I believe it has an Aerospace engineering option. An aero major will take very similar courses as an undergrad to a mech. However, I'm not sure how close the engineering science with an option in aerospace is to a straight up mech program (in terms of actual courses in the programs). You should compare the two programs (mech vs engsci aerospace) to see how closely related they are. If you want to do research in mech/aerospace, the engsci option will probably be better, if you just want a job after graduation, straight mech would probably be better. Again, I have not looked at the actual courses a mech major takes versus an engsci aerospace major, specifically at UofT.
 
  • #32
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You should also consider that employers may not understand that MechE degree may be equivalent to an Aerospace EngSci degree -- not that they are equivalent... they may or may not be.

So, it could possibly make it more difficult to get a MechE job.
 
  • #33
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Eng Sci seems like a waste of time and is only useful if you wish to pursue graduate school after your undergrad in which case you should just get a BSc.
I almost went with an Eng Phys degree because (and what a concept!) I wanted to learn about engineering as well as physics.

And I'm sorry to do this... But you're doing an awful lot of talking about what something is worth in industry, but your profile says you're a high school student.
 
  • #34
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I almost went with an Eng Phys degree because (and what a concept!) I wanted to learn about engineering as well as physics.

And I'm sorry to do this... But you're doing an awful lot of talking about what something is worth in industry, but your profile says you're a high school student.
You're absolutely correct I am a high school student. In fact I'm not sure what relevance it has to the discussion other then the lack of experience I may have. That is irrelevant anyways since most of my opinions are based off other's opinions who have gone into EngSci and who have gone into the regular engineering path at U of T.

I wasn't in anyway trying to degrade the value of an EngSci degree in industry but merely asking the question or rather suggesting the common opinion that not many employers know the difference between an EngSci degree and a regular engineering degree. Following from this premise wouldn't you think it would be logical to go into the regular engineering path and get a higher GPA since employers view EngSci and regular engineering on the same grounds. Also regular engineering is more general which is more desirable for employers i.e mechanical engineering, ECE, Electrical Engineering and Chemical Engineering. In that since it would be a waste of time to go into EngSci if you just wish to go into industry and compete for the same jobs as regular engineers whom are more desirable for said reasons.
 
  • #35
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Would one end up with less skill (for industry) in the major of their choice in EngSci as opposed to going The regular program?
 
  • #36
really depends on luck, interview, connections , reccomendations , timing, ability to sell yourself, skills, internships, coop, experience,

these would matter a lot more than
you either being engineering science/ engineering other regular majors
 
  • #37
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Hopefully you are still lurking around this forum :)

I am really anxious because my average is not enough to get into EngSci programme. (The department requires IB predicted grade of 35 but I think I have something like 32). But I really want to get into Engineering Physics programme. So if I boost my predicted grade up to 36 or get a final result of 36, do you think they will give me an offeR?
 
  • #38
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You're absolutely correct I am a high school student. In fact I'm not sure what relevance it has to the discussion other then the lack of experience I may have. That is irrelevant anyways since most of my opinions are based off other's opinions who have gone into EngSci and who have gone into the regular engineering path at U of T.

I wasn't in anyway trying to degrade the value of an EngSci degree in industry but merely asking the question or rather suggesting the common opinion that not many employers know the difference between an EngSci degree and a regular engineering degree. Following from this premise wouldn't you think it would be logical to go into the regular engineering path and get a higher GPA since employers view EngSci and regular engineering on the same grounds. Also regular engineering is more general which is more desirable for employers i.e mechanical engineering, ECE, Electrical Engineering and Chemical Engineering. In that since it would be a waste of time to go into EngSci if you just wish to go into industry and compete for the same jobs as regular engineers whom are more desirable for said reasons.
This is wrong. Really wrong.

Eng Sci is THE MOST USEFUL. There is tons of information on this but I will repeat it. Eng Sci take all the hard courses from other disciplines. Their undergrad degree is the most prestigious in U of T, which makes it one of the most prestigious undergrad degrees in Canada.

Eng Sci students get high end job offers from large engineering companies after graduation. A friend of mine graduated recently and got several offered positions with a 6 figure salary. This is equal to a petrolium engineer, but above the rest.

I can only assume you made guesses about the job opportunity for an Eng Sci degree. Facts are not in your favor.
 
  • #39
901
2
This is wrong. Really wrong.

Eng Sci is THE MOST USEFUL. There is tons of information on this but I will repeat it. Eng Sci take all the hard courses from other disciplines. Their undergrad degree is the most prestigious in U of T, which makes it one of the most prestigious undergrad degrees in Canada.

Eng Sci students get high end job offers from large engineering companies after graduation. A friend of mine graduated recently and got several offered positions with a 6 figure salary. This is equal to a petrolium engineer, but above the rest.

I can only assume you made guesses about the job opportunity for an Eng Sci degree. Facts are not in your favor.
Alright, let's begin with contradiction number one:

"I can only assume you made guesses about the job opportunity for an Eng Sci degree."

And you state: "Eng Sci is THE MOST USEFUL"

A purely opinionated statement.

"There is tons of information on this but I will repeat it. Eng Sci take all the hard courses from other disciplines. Their undergrad degree is the most prestigious in U of T, which makes it one of the most prestigious undergrad degrees in Canada."

Provide me a quantitative definition of prestige. Beyond that, give me an external source that states that Eng Sci is the best engineering degree.

"Eng Sci students get high end job offers from large engineering companies after graduation. A friend of mine graduated recently and got several offered positions with a 6 figure salary. This is equal to a petrolium engineer, but above the rest."

Brilliant, you have pulled a single student from the program and extend their success to everyone else, I'm sorry but that isn't how a general census is done.

Also, all of my "guesses" are actually based on dozens of people I've spoken too who have gone into the program and have had friends go into the program. If you want a challenge, fine do it, but learning about quantum mechanics and complex analysis may not be a trait that employers find completely useful. Employers purely look for workplace experience and GPA the former may give an Eng Sci the advantage but the latter is hard to come by, Eng Sci is really tough and if you want to take the risk, go for it.
 
  • #40
35
0
This is wrong. Really wrong.

Eng Sci is THE MOST USEFUL. There is tons of information on this but I will repeat it. Eng Sci take all the hard courses from other disciplines. Their undergrad degree is the most prestigious in U of T, which makes it one of the most prestigious undergrad degrees in Canada.

Eng Sci students get high end job offers from large engineering companies after graduation. A friend of mine graduated recently and got several offered positions with a 6 figure salary. This is equal to a petrolium engineer, but above the rest.

I can only assume you made guesses about the job opportunity for an Eng Sci degree. Facts are not in your favor.
I see, you've been fed the U of T EngSci propaganda. What you said is really not true at all. It may be (one of) the most prestigious degrees in Canada because of the difficulty, but EngSci grads almost always compete for the same jobs are engineers who went into regular programs. Do a quick job search and you'll see how many employers ask or care for an EngSci degree. What makes you think EngSci grads will get paid more than a grad who went through a regular program? They're (in most cases) going to have the exact same jobs as the regular folks, which translates to same salary.

EngSci is designed for people who do not know what they want to do, or for people who are unsure between science and engineering. That's why you pick a major after two years. It's also for those who want a challenge. Simple fact: EngSci jobs do not exist. There is no advantage in terms of jobs if you go into EngSci.

That being said, I highly recommend EngSci if you're unsure as to what engineering to pursue or are having major troubles deciding between engineering and science.
 

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