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Equations in Classical Mechanics

  1. Jul 1, 2012 #1
    hi
    i am a bit confused watching lectures and reeding books i quite often come across dx/dt
    and i don't know what the "d" is. the full equation is F=ma which was rewritable as F=m*dx/dt
    many thanks for any help
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 1, 2012 #2

    Integral

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    Sounds like you need to watch some lectures on Math. Calculus specifically. Of course to make sense of that you will need to be familiar with algebra.

    Physics is a structure build on math. Without math you cannot do physics.
     
  4. Jul 1, 2012 #3

    jedishrfu

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    also in your eqn I think you mean dv/dt not dx/dt where v means velocity.
     
  5. Jul 1, 2012 #4
  6. Jul 1, 2012 #5
    what type of Calculus should i be looking at? Differential Calculus, Ap calculus, Lambda Calculus or another type (i only know a bit of Differential Calculus)
    Thanks
     
  7. Jul 1, 2012 #6

    Integral

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    Start with differential calculus.
     
  8. Jul 1, 2012 #7

    Nugatory

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  9. Jul 1, 2012 #8

    jedishrfu

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    in the video he was contrasting Aristotles law with Newton's law. InAristotle's world F=mv and F is a function of x but in Newton's it was F=ma. Aristotle believed that forces cause motion whereas Newton believed that forces cause acceleration.
     
  10. Jul 1, 2012 #9
    what is x is it location?
     
  11. Jul 1, 2012 #10

    jedishrfu

    Staff: Mentor

    thats a yes
     
  12. Jul 2, 2012 #11
    thank you for your help :) it seams i have a bit of reading to do before i get back to the really interesting stuff
     
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