False Teeth: Discomfort & Costly Expense

  • Thread starter wolram
  • Start date
In summary, the person is experiencing discomfort with their false teeth which were a cheaper alternative to getting implants. They were advised to look into getting implants in the US or Mexico for a lower cost. The person was also advised to try different sealing pastes and have the dentist adjust the fixtures for better comfort. The option of a permanent partial bridge was also suggested, but it may not have been offered because the missing teeth are in the very back. The person also mentioned that they have free healthcare in Britain.
  • #1
wolram
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But i now have two false teeth and they feel awful, i wanted implants but they would have cost me £5000 and i could not justify this expense, these false ones cost me £540 and i feel i have paid to have discomfort, may be i will get used to the blasted things, but for now it feels as if i have a lump of silly putty stuck to the roof of my mouth.
 
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  • #2
wolram said:
But i now have two false teeth and they feel awful, i wanted implants but they would have cost me £5000 and i could not justify this expense, these false ones cost me £540 and i feel i have paid to have discomfort, may be i will get used to the blasted things, but for now it feels as if i have a lump of silly putty stuck to the roof of my mouth.
You should price what implants would cost in the US and fly over here to get it done. I think it may be around $2-3K (for 2 implants), although one site in the US claims $1K-$5K/implant.
 
  • #3
It is my understanding that they might also be cheap in places like Juarez, Mexico. My dentist quoted me approx $5k per implant. I assume from your post that you're having trouble with the plastic thingy (that's a dental technical term not commonly divulged to laymen) that either sits on your gum or against the roof of your mouth. Try different sealing pastes; they seem like they should be the same but there's a world of difference. I personally like Super Poligrip.

Also see if you can get the dentist to adjust the fixture. A tiny tweak can make a huge change in comfort sometimes.

Good luck!
 
  • #4
I think your dentist needs to grind down the plastic thingy. You really should go back and get it checked. In my experience, dental problems sometimes compound over time and you could end up with a much worse problem. You don't want to end up getting TMJ problems...if the plastic thingy is beating up a natural tooth, the natural tooth will lose.
 
  • #5
Astronuc said:
You should price what implants would cost in the US and fly over here to get it done. I think it may be around $2-3K (for 2 implants), although one site in the US claims $1K-$5K/implant.
Wow if i can find a place i am on my way, and this time i will not step over the line before i am beckoned.
 
  • #6
lisab said:
I think your dentist needs to grind down the plastic thingy. You really should go back and get it checked. In my experience, dental problems sometimes compound over time and you could end up with a much worse problem. You don't want to end up getting TMJ problems...if the plastic thingy is beating up a natural tooth, the natural tooth will lose.

I think they fit ok it is just the general feel.
 
  • #7
Why doesn't she do a permanent partial bridge?
 
  • #8
TVP45 said:
It is my understanding that they might also be cheap in places like Juarez, Mexico.

I would be very, very careful before having any medical procedure done in Mexico. This is not a prejudicial statement; the legitimate medical practitioners there are as good as you'll find anywhere. Unfortunately, a very high percentage of the people at 'cut-rate' clinics don't even have the credentials to be a student in Europe or North America. You wouldn't believe (or even want to hear) the horror stories of people who have gone down there for cosmetic surgery or liposuction or cancer treatment and wound up ruined for life.
 
  • #9
Do you have a Dremel?
 
  • #10
Evo said:
Why doesn't she do a permanent partial bridge?

I did not think about this option and it was not offered, may be it was because the two teeth are the very back ones.
 
  • #11
Obviously not wisdom teeth though or you might have thought of the bridge.
 
  • #12
wolram said:
I did not think about this option and it was not offered, may be it was because the two teeth are the very back ones.
That would be the reason, you need a tooth on either side of the bridge.
 
  • #13
Learned something new today. I guess that's why they call it a bridge and not a pier.
 
  • #14
Don't you guys have free healthcare over in Britain?
 
  • #15
tribdog said:
Learned something new today. I guess that's why they call it a bridge and not a pier.
A tooth pier. :smile:
 
  • #16
wolram said:
I did not think about this option and it was not offered, may be it was because the two teeth are the very back ones.

If they're the very back ones, why even bother? Nobody will see they're missing, and it won't be long before you get used to not having them there. You still have the rest of the molars for chomping up your food. If the false teeth are so uncomfortable, it might be better to simply do without.
 

Related to False Teeth: Discomfort & Costly Expense

1. What causes discomfort when wearing false teeth?

Discomfort when wearing false teeth can be caused by a variety of factors such as ill-fitting dentures, improper cleaning and maintenance, gum irritation or infection, and jawbone changes over time. It is important to consult with a dentist to determine the specific cause of discomfort and address it accordingly.

2. How can I reduce discomfort when wearing false teeth?

There are several ways to reduce discomfort when wearing false teeth. These include regularly cleaning and maintaining dentures, using denture adhesive to improve fit, practicing good oral hygiene, and visiting a dentist for adjustments or potential replacement of dentures.

3. Are there any alternatives to traditional false teeth that are more comfortable?

Yes, there are alternatives to traditional false teeth that may offer more comfort. These include implant-supported dentures, which are anchored to the jawbone for a more secure fit, and flexible dentures made of a softer material that can be more comfortable for some individuals.

4. How much do false teeth typically cost?

The cost of false teeth can vary depending on the type of dentures, materials used, and any additional procedures or services needed. On average, traditional false teeth can cost between $1,000 to $3,000 per arch. However, it is best to consult with a dentist for a personalized cost estimate.

5. Are false teeth a costly expense in the long run?

While the upfront cost of false teeth may seem expensive, they can actually save money in the long run. Without teeth or with missing teeth, individuals may experience difficulty eating and speaking, leading to a decline in overall health. False teeth can help maintain oral health and prevent potential health issues, resulting in potential cost savings in the long term.

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