Figuring Out Enthalpy Changes in High School Chemistry Labs

In summary, the conversation discussed the confusion of a chemistry teacher who assigned a lab project to determine enthalpy changes in a chemical reaction using common high school chemicals. The individual suggested potential reactions, including a double displacement reaction and a dehydration/hydration reaction, and asked for feedback and recommendations. The possibility of performing a simple calorimetry experiment and using neutralization as an option were also mentioned.
  • #1
soggybread
20
0
Well, my chemistry teacher is extremely confusing, and wants us to create our own lab where we figure out the enthalpy changes in a chemical reaction. Is there are reaction out there that would give a considerable change in temperature, while using chemicals typically found in a high school? As an aside, he also gave us an option to

Here's what I've come up with so far... it would be great if I could get some feedback on these reactions.

1. [tex]Mg_ (s) + HCl_ (aq) [/tex]

(Last resort, because my teacher recommends a double displacement reaction)

2. [tex]NaOH_ (aq)+ HCl_ (aq) [/tex]

(Another last resort, because my teacher recommends a double displacement reaction)

3. [tex]CuSO_4_(aq) + 2NaCl_ (aq) [/tex]

(I have no idea if there's going to be any heat change from this)
Any help on this would be fantastic and very much appreciated!

Thanks,

soggybread
 
Last edited:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
You can perform a simple calorimetry experiment, have you been exposed to this concept so far?
 
  • #3
sulfuric acid to sugar is really fun... is that a double replacement... I'd have to think... but it does let off a lot of heat... and the charred black mess is awesome.

Edit: they are calling it a "DEHYDRATION/HYDRATION" reaction:
http://chemlearn.chem.indiana.edu/demos/TheDehyd.htm
 
Last edited:
  • #4
Neutralization should be OK - enough heat to measure and concentrations of reactants easy to check.
 

Related to Figuring Out Enthalpy Changes in High School Chemistry Labs

1. What is enthalpy and why is it important in chemistry labs?

Enthalpy is a measure of the total heat content of a system, including both the internal energy and the energy required to make room for the system in its surroundings. In chemistry labs, enthalpy is important because it helps us understand the energy changes that occur during chemical reactions, which can affect the rate and direction of the reaction.

2. How do you calculate enthalpy changes in high school chemistry labs?

Enthalpy changes can be calculated using the formula ΔH = q/m, where ΔH is the enthalpy change, q is the heat transferred, and m is the mass of the substance. This formula can be applied to different types of reactions, such as combustion, neutralization, or dissolution, to determine the enthalpy change.

3. What equipment is needed to measure enthalpy changes in high school chemistry labs?

To measure enthalpy changes, you will need a calorimeter, which is a device used to measure the heat absorbed or released during a chemical reaction. Other equipment that may be needed includes a thermometer, a balance, and various chemicals and solutions depending on the specific reaction being studied.

4. How can enthalpy changes be affected by experimental errors?

Experimental errors can affect enthalpy changes in a number of ways. For example, inaccurate measurements of mass or temperature can lead to incorrect calculations. Improper insulation of the calorimeter can also result in heat loss or gain, affecting the accuracy of the enthalpy change. It is important to carefully follow procedures and make precise measurements to minimize experimental errors.

5. How are enthalpy changes used to determine the energy efficiency of a reaction?

Enthalpy changes can be used to determine the energy efficiency of a reaction by comparing the amount of energy released or absorbed during the reaction to the amount of energy required to break and form bonds between atoms. A more efficient reaction will have a higher enthalpy change, meaning it releases more energy while requiring less energy to occur.

Similar threads

Replies
1
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
203
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
13
Views
7K
  • STEM Academic Advising
2
Replies
54
Views
5K
Replies
4
Views
4K
Back
Top