Find largest possible volume (Extreme Value)

  • #1
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A right triangle the hypotenuse of which is c revolves about a small side. A right circular cone is formed. Find the largest possible volume of the cone.

Vcone: pi*r^2*(h/3)


I don't get why they mentioned the hypotenuse, since it is not even in the volume formula...
Since it is a 'right' triangle, shouldn't the maximum height of the cone be 1?
But I still don't know which extreme value I should search for...
(The solution should be: 1/(9*sqrt3) * c^3 * pi )

Could someone please help me to?
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
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A right triangle the hypotenuse of which is c revolves about a small side. A right circular cone is formed. Find the largest possible volume of the cone.

Vcone: pi*r^2*(h/3)


I don't get why they mentioned the hypotenuse, since it is not even in the volume formula...
Since it is a 'right' triangle, shouldn't the maximum height of the cone be 1?
But I still don't know which extreme value I should search for...
(The solution should be: 1/(9*sqrt3) * c^3 * pi )

Could someone please help me to?
You mentioned the solution which obviously has a ##c## in it. So probably the hypotenuse will play a role.
How do you derive that ##h=1##?
As I see it from your solution you are supposed to maximize ##V_{cone}## for a given length of the hypotenuse ##c##.
Clearly ##c=0## is a minimum.
How do you usually calculate maxima?
 
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  • #3
We only learned to make the derivative equal to zero in order to find it.
 
  • #4
pbuk
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I think there is a mistake in the answer which you will find if you work through it.

If you know that the sloping side of the cone is the hypotenuse of a right angled triangle length c, can you find a relationship between c, r and h?
 
  • #5
isn't it
c^2= r^2+h^2 ?
r^2 = c^2 - h^2

Then I could substitute it:

V = pi * (c^2-h^2) * h/3
then
V = pi * ( (c^2h/3) - (h^3/3) )
V = pi * h/3 * (c^2 - h^2)

derivative:

pi * h/3 * d/dc (c^2 - h^2)
= 2/3 * pi * h * c

But this isn't the solution... What did I do wrong?
 
  • #6
HallsofIvy
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The fact that they say "the hypotenuse of which is c" tells you that the hypotenuse is a constant. You certainly should NOT be differentiating with respect to c!
 
  • #7
pbuk
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isn't it
c^2= r^2+h^2 ?
r^2 = c^2 - h^2

Then I could substitute it:

V = pi * (c^2-h^2) * h/3
then
V = pi * ( (c^2h/3) - (h^3/3) )
You're doing fine up to here, let me write it more clearly as $$ V = \frac{\pi c^2}3 h - \frac 13 h^3 $$So taking on board HallsOfIvy's comment, what's next?
 
  • #8
Ray Vickson
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You're doing fine up to here, let me write it more clearly as $$ V = \frac{\pi c^2}3 h - \frac 13 h^3 $$So taking on board HallsOfIvy's comment, what's next?

No. The equation
[tex] V = \frac{\pi c^2}3 h - \frac 13 h^3 [/tex]
is not correct. However, the equation
[tex] V = \frac{\pi}{3} \left( c^2 h - h^3 \right) [/tex]
is correct.
 
  • #9
pbuk
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No. The equation
[tex] V = \frac{\pi c^2}3 h - \frac 13 h^3 [/tex]
is not correct. However, the equation
[tex] V = \frac{\pi}{3} \left( c^2 h - h^3 \right) [/tex]
is correct.
Ah thanks for fixing that, I wanted to split up the terms to make the differentiation more obvious but made a mess of it!
 

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