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Homework Help: Find the maximum height and the range of the ball.

  1. Sep 3, 2007 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known dataThe acceleration due to gravity on the moon has a magnitude of 1.62m/s^2. Assume that the ball is kicked on the moon instead of on the earth. Find(a) the maximum height H and (b) the range that the ballwould attain on the moon.
    acceleration=1.62 m/s^2
    H=?
    R=?
    Vy=0 m/s
    Voy=?


    2. Relevant equations
    H=-Voy^2/ 2(Ay)



    3. The attempt at a solution

    Ok I have no Idea what the initial velocity is, so how can I calculate this problem.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2007
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 3, 2007 #2

    hage567

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    Homework Helper

    Are you sure you've given all the information stated in the question?
     
  4. Sep 3, 2007 #3
    Well here's the original question. Review Interactive Learning Ware 2.3 at www.wiley.com/college/cutnell in preparation for this problem. The acceleration due to gravity on the moon has a magnitude of 1.62m/s^2. Assume that the ball is kicked on the moon instead of on the earth. Find(a) the maximum height H and (b) the range that the ballwould attain on the moon.
    acceleration=1.62 m/s^2
     
  5. Sep 3, 2007 #4
    then it says look at example 6-8 in your book. I know what equation to use, but the question only gives me gravity.
     
  6. Sep 3, 2007 #5

    Astronuc

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    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    One would need the initial velocity and angle with respect to horizontal.

    Otherwise one can only determine the ratios of R and H on the moon with respect to the corresponding R and H on earth, assuming the same initial velocity and angle.

    Is there a reference to a similar problem on the earth?
     
  7. Sep 3, 2007 #6
    ok in the examples the initial velocity of the football is 14 m/s on earth
     
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