Swinging Tarzan: Solving for Maximum Height & Angle

In summary, Tarzan runs at 6 m/s and grabs a 4.1 m vertical vine tied to a branch, swinging up to a maximum height. The maximum angle of the vine with respect to vertical does not affect the height. Using the conservation of energy equation, h = 1/2(6)^2/9.8, we can solve for h to find the maximum height Tarzan will swing up to.
  • #1
physicshelppls
11
0

Homework Statement


Tarzan runs at 6 m/s and grabs a vertical vine (negligible mass) of length 4.1 m which is tied to a branch at the top. Tarzan then swings up.

Determine the maximum height Tarzan will swing up and the maximum angle the vine will make with respect to vertical.

Homework Equations


mgh = 1/2mv2 ?

The Attempt at a Solution


I did a problem about the height of the swing previously, but mass was given. I would solve for m if height was given, but neither are so I'm not sure where to begin. I'm sure there is another equation. Is this a pendulum problem? We haven't covered much on pendulums. Sorry if this is not enough for an attempt at a solution.
 
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  • #2
Hi physicshelppls,

Welcome to Physics Forums!

Notice that in your relevant equation that the mass cancels on each side? You can proceed to analyze the problem leaving 'm' in as a variable, but your relevant equation implies that it will cancel out along the way.

In fact, it is common in physics to use what are called "specific quantities", where energies for example are specified in terms of Joules per kilogram (J/kg). So your conservation of energy formula becomes gh = 1/2v2.
 
  • #3
Oh wow, I feel dumb for not even noticing that. So does the length of the vine not matter in finding the height?

9.8h = 1/2(6)2 and I just solve for h to get the answer to the first part?
 
  • #4
physicshelppls said:
Oh wow, I feel dumb for not even noticing that. So does the length of the vine not matter in finding the height?
Nope, doesn't matter.
9.8h = 1/2(6)2 and I just solve for h to get the answer to the first part?
Looks good.
 

Related to Swinging Tarzan: Solving for Maximum Height & Angle

1. What is the purpose of solving for maximum height and angle in the Swinging Tarzan experiment?

The purpose of this experiment is to determine the optimal angle and speed at which Tarzan should swing on a vine in order to achieve the maximum height possible. This helps us understand the principles of projectile motion and can be applied to other real-world scenarios, such as launching objects or athletes in sports.

2. How do you calculate the maximum height and angle in the Swinging Tarzan experiment?

The maximum height and angle can be calculated using the equations of motion and the principles of projectile motion. The initial velocity, angle of launch, and gravitational acceleration are all factors that contribute to the maximum height and angle. These can be determined through experimentation or by using mathematical calculations.

3. What factors can affect the maximum height and angle in the Swinging Tarzan experiment?

The maximum height and angle can be affected by various factors such as the initial velocity, angle of launch, air resistance, and the mass and shape of the object being swung. Other external factors like wind, temperature, and humidity can also impact the results of the experiment.

4. How can the results of the Swinging Tarzan experiment be applied in real life?

The principles learned from this experiment can be applied in various real-life scenarios, such as designing amusement park rides, calculating trajectories for sports like baseball or golf, and even in engineering and construction projects. Understanding the maximum height and angle of a projectile can also help in predicting and preventing accidents or disasters, such as landslides or rock falls.

5. What are the limitations of the Swinging Tarzan experiment?

One limitation of this experiment is that it assumes ideal conditions, such as a perfectly straight vine and no air resistance. In reality, there are many external factors that can impact the results. Additionally, the experiment may not accurately represent the motion of a swinging human due to differences in weight, strength, and technique. It is important to consider these limitations when interpreting the results and applying them to real-life situations.

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