Hockey Puck Collision--momentum problem

  • Thread starter mtruong1999
  • Start date
In summary, the problem involves two hockey pucks colliding at a glancing blow, with one initially moving at 10 m/s in the x direction and the other stationary. Using momentum conservation and assuming equal mass for both pucks, the final speeds and scattering angles can be calculated. The final velocities in the x direction would be v2Acos40 and v2Bcos50, while the final velocities in the y direction would be v2Asin40 and -v2Bsin50. The change in kinetic energy can also be determined.
  • #1
mtruong1999

Homework Statement


The problem reads:
"Hockey puck A sliding on ice with velocity 10 m/s in the x direction collides at a glancing blow with a second stationary puck B. Puck A scatters at an angle of θA= 40 degrees above the x axis, while B slides away at an angle ofθB= 50 degrees below the x axis. (a) Use momentum conservation to find the final speeds vA and vB of the two pucks, respectively. What is the change in kinetic energy? (b) What are the two scattering angles according to an observer in the center of mass frame of reference?"

Homework Equations


mAv1A + mBv1B = mAv2A + mBv2B

The Attempt at a Solution


Ok, so far I divided the problem into x and y components, where the final velocities in the x direction would be v2Acos40 and v2Bcos50 and the final velocities in the y direction would be v2Asin40 and -v2Bsin50. I feel like there are too many unknowns, we aren't given the masses of the two pucks, and I have absolutely no clue how to do this problem without the masses of the pucks. I have 4 unknowns (final velocities and the masses) and only two equations. Am I missing something? How do I approach this problem??
 
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  • #2
Assume the pucks have equal mass.
 
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  • #3
TSny said:
Assume the pucks have equal mass.
Then the masses will cancel out?? BRILLIANT, that makes a lot of sense, thank you!
 

Related to Hockey Puck Collision--momentum problem

What is the definition of momentum in the context of hockey puck collision?

Momentum is a measure of an object's motion, calculated by multiplying its mass by its velocity. In the context of hockey puck collision, it refers to the transfer of energy and motion between two pucks when they collide.

Why is momentum important in hockey puck collisions?

Momentum is important in hockey puck collisions because it determines the outcome of the collision. The puck with higher momentum will transfer more energy to the other puck, causing it to move with a greater velocity.

How is momentum conserved in a hockey puck collision?

In a closed system, such as a hockey puck collision, the total momentum before and after the collision is always equal. This means that the sum of the initial momentums of the two pucks is equal to the sum of their final momentums.

What factors affect the momentum in a hockey puck collision?

The main factors that affect momentum in a hockey puck collision are mass and velocity. A puck with a greater mass or velocity will have a higher momentum. Other factors that may affect momentum include friction and the angle of collision.

How can the conservation of momentum be applied in real-life hockey situations?

The conservation of momentum can be applied in real-life hockey situations to predict the outcome of collisions between players or pucks. It can also be used to analyze the effectiveness of shots and passes, as well as to design strategies for maximizing momentum in gameplay.

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