Finding Stress Concentration Factor K for Chamfered Joints

In summary, the conversation discusses the difficulty in finding the stress concentration factor, K, for a chamfered joint compared to a fillet joint. One solution suggested is to model the joint in a CAD program and conduct a stress analysis. However, there is no clear reference for this specific case and it may be necessary to make assumptions or use a conservative approach.
  • #1
patrickv
5
0
Hello, I have a rod of two different diameters and I'm trying to find the stress concentration at the chamfer between the two diameters. I understand how to find the stress concentration factor, K, if the joint was a fillet (using r/d and D/d to find K in the appropriate table). However I can't find any way of getting K for a chamfered joint. Please help point me in some direction. Thanks so much. I've attached a quick diagram showing the filleted and chamfered versions of the shaft. The chamfered one is the actual piece I'm trying to find K for.
 

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  • #2
I would make a model in SolidWorks or some other CAD program, and do stress analysis. Should be pretty easy.
 
  • #3
There is no reference in either Peterson's or Roark's for this. I do remember Q_Goest having the same post a year or so ago. You may want to do a search for that thread. I can not remember what conclusion he came to. I would start by treating it as a very small radius, which in reality is the truth. You will not machine a perfectly sharp corner.
 
  • #4
Brian_C said:
I would make a model in SolidWorks or some other CAD program, and do stress analysis. Should be pretty easy.

Chamfers are by definition sharp corners. Getting real stress results from a sharp corner numerically is quite a challenge, dare I say impossible. It's hard enough getting real stress numbers in a fillet where you can actually get grid to follow the surface.

You may have to assume a filleted case and take some sort of worst conservative case.
 
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Related to Finding Stress Concentration Factor K for Chamfered Joints

1. What is a stress concentration factor (K) and why is it important in chamfered joints?

A stress concentration factor (K) is a dimensionless factor that represents the ratio of the maximum stress at a point in a structure to the nominal stress. In chamfered joints, where there is a change in geometry or a sharp corner, K is important because it helps engineers determine the maximum stress and potential failure points in the joint.

2. How is the stress concentration factor (K) calculated for chamfered joints?

The stress concentration factor (K) can be calculated using various methods, including analytical equations, finite element analysis, and experimental testing. The most commonly used method is the analytical approach, which involves using equations and stress concentration factors charts specific to the type of chamfered joint being analyzed.

3. What factors affect the stress concentration factor (K) in chamfered joints?

The stress concentration factor (K) is influenced by several factors, including the geometry of the chamfer, the loading conditions, and the material properties of the joint. The size and angle of the chamfer, as well as the applied load, can significantly impact the value of K.

4. How can the stress concentration factor (K) be reduced in chamfered joints?

To reduce the stress concentration factor (K) in chamfered joints, engineers can use design modifications such as rounding the corners of the chamfer or increasing the chamfer angle. Another approach is to use materials with higher strength and ductility, which can help distribute the stress more evenly and reduce the impact of the chamfer on the joint's overall strength.

5. Are there any limitations to using stress concentration factors (K) for chamfered joints?

While stress concentration factors (K) are a valuable tool for analyzing chamfered joints, they have some limitations. These factors only provide an approximation of the stress distribution in a joint and may not accurately predict failure in all cases. Additionally, K values are typically derived from idealized geometric shapes and may not account for the complexities and imperfections in real-world joints.

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