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Finding the distance given the intital velocity and the coefficient of friction

  1. Jul 8, 2012 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    A car is travelling at 15.5m/s travels on a surface where μ=0.1. The driver sees a boy run into the road 125 m ahead. She immedietly applies the brakes, locking the wheel, and skids to a stop. Where will the car be when it stops? (i.e:Will it hit the boy?)

    I know I should start by figuring out the acceleration and then use

    Vfinal^2=V inital^2 + 2ad

    But, I am having trouble finding the acceleration.

    2. Relevant equations
    Fnet=ma
    Ffriction= μFN
    Vfinal^2=V inital^2 + 2ad


    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 8, 2012 #2

    tiny-tim

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    welcome to pf!

    hi lenalee.9520! welcome to pf! :smile:

    (try using the X2 button just above the Reply box :wink:)
    call the mass "m"

    then find the force, and divide by m :wink:

    (the force will be µ times … ? :smile:)
     
  4. Jul 8, 2012 #3
    Well I ended up with

    Ffriction= -mgµ

    Is this correct?
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2012
  5. Jul 8, 2012 #4

    tiny-tim

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    call the mass "m" !! :rolleyes:

    (it'll cancel out in the end)
     
  6. Jul 8, 2012 #5
    Ffriction= -mgµ

    Is what I got...
    But how does it cancel out??
     
  7. Jul 8, 2012 #6
    You could identify it as an energy related problem.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2012
  8. Jul 8, 2012 #7
    Well, my teacher told the class that we should only need equations from the kinematics and dynamics unit, so I've been trying to stick to those things. (I have to turn this in, so I would like to follow his instructions as much as possible, for the sake of my mark)
     
  9. Jul 8, 2012 #8
    As tiny-tim said, call the mass 'm'
    Then if you apply force to it, what is the acceleration?
     
  10. Jul 8, 2012 #9
    [itex]\sum[/itex]F = ma = [itex]\mu[/itex]kmg
    Once you solve for the acceleration, the rest is just a 'timeless' kinematics problem.
    Vf2 = 0 = Vo2 + 2aΔx
     
  11. Jul 9, 2012 #10

    tiny-tim

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    acceleration = Ffriction/m ? :wink:
     
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