Finding the magnitude of the force and direction.

In summary, the problem involves a long wire carrying 6.50A of current making two bends, with the bent part passing through a uniform 0.280T magnetic field. The task is to find the magnitude and direction of the force exerted by the magnetic field on the wire. Using the equation F=IlB, with I=6.50A, B=0.280T, and l=0.8m, the initial attempt yielded a magnitude of 1.456N, which was incorrect. After considering the length of the wire and the direction of the force vectors from the segments, the correct approach was determined.
  • #1
jimmyboykun
39
0

Homework Statement



A long wire carrying 6.50A of current makes two bends. The bent part of the wire passes through a uniform 0.280T magnetic field directed as shown in the figure and confined to a limited region of space.
Part A: Find the magnitude of the force that the magnetic field exerts on the wire.
Part B: Find the direction of the force that the magnetic field exerts on the wire.

here is the link for the figure. http://s16.postimg.org/li2tzpa4l/yg_20_92.jpg

Homework Equations



F=IlB


The Attempt at a Solution



I= 6.50A, B= 0.280T, and l=0.8m(I did the Pythagorean theorem to find the lenght)

F=(6.50A)(0.8m)(0.280T)

F= 1.456N.

I found the force, but I got the answer wrong. Can someone explain where did I go wrong? I'm confuse with this problem.
 
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  • #2
jimmyboykun said:

Homework Statement



A long wire carrying 6.50A of current makes two bends. The bent part of the wire passes through a uniform 0.280T magnetic field directed as shown in the figure and confined to a limited region of space.
Part A: Find the magnitude of the force that the magnetic field exerts on the wire.
Part B: Find the direction of the force that the magnetic field exerts on the wire.

here is the link for the figure. http://s16.postimg.org/li2tzpa4l/yg_20_92.jpg

Homework Equations



F=IlB

The Attempt at a Solution



I= 6.50A, B= 0.280T, and l=0.8m(I did the Pythagorean theorem to find the lenght)

F=(6.50A)(0.8m)(0.280T)

F= 1.456N.

I found the force, but I got the answer wrong. Can someone explain where did I go wrong? I'm confuse with this problem.
The length you have is wrong.

80 cm of wire is at a 30° angle to the "horizontal", but there is also some length that is "horizontal" .

Furthermore, the force vectors from those two (or three) segments are not in the same direction.

attachment.php?attachmentid=66805&stc=1&d=1392870965.jpg
 

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  • #3
ok so I think I figured out how to approach this problem. Thanks
 

Related to Finding the magnitude of the force and direction.

1. How do you find the magnitude of a force?

The magnitude of a force can be found by using the formula F = m x a, where F is the force, m is the mass of the object, and a is the acceleration. This formula is known as Newton's Second Law of Motion.

2. What units are used to measure force?

Force is typically measured in Newtons (N) in the International System of Units (SI). However, other units such as pounds (lb) or kilograms-force (kgf) may also be used.

3. How do you determine the direction of a force?

The direction of a force can be determined by using a coordinate system and assigning positive and negative values to indicate the direction. Alternatively, the direction can be described using angles or vectors.

4. Can the direction of a force change?

Yes, the direction of a force can change depending on the motion and orientation of the object it is acting on. For example, a force may change direction if the object is rotating or if an external force is applied.

5. How is the magnitude and direction of a force represented?

The magnitude and direction of a force are often represented using a vector diagram. The length of the vector represents the magnitude of the force and the direction is indicated by an arrow pointing in the direction of the force.

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